Here Are a Bunch of Super Easy Ways You Can Wear and Style a Scarf

Photo credit: Jeremy Moeller - Getty Images
Photo credit: Jeremy Moeller – Getty Images

From Cosmopolitan

Forget sweater season, it’s all about scarf season! Yes, knits are a cold-weather must, but the thing that makes your winter outfit look even cozier is a chic scarf thrown around your neck. It’ll save you from icy wind and it’s a great way to dress up or add a little something extra to your ensemble. And there are so many ways to wear them! Whether you’re knotting, looping, or knotting AND looping yours, the way you style your scarf can change up your ‘fit in an instant.

Here, I took some rectangular scarves I had in my closet to demonstrate nine ways to wear them. And if you ever doubted your scarf-styling skills (I’m guessing that’s why you landed on this very page), these are all super simple to nail, trust me.

There are even more ways to wear them depending on the other kinds of scarves you have like square ones or infinity ones, but longer rectangular ones are arguably the most basic and popular style during the colder months.

Need more winter how tos? Here are the different ways to wear a beanie and exactly how to clean those suede boots that have water damage or salt on them from last year. But back to scarves—let’s get into how to wear ’em below!

The Drape

This one’s pretty simple. Just throw it around your neck and let it hang, making sure the sides are even.

The Loop

Start this one off like how you’d drape it, but instead you’ll take one side and loop it around your neck once. Again, make sure the sides are even once complete.

The Tie

Hang it around your neck, and then taking the tails on both sides, tie them together and pull until the knot hits where you prefer.

The Toss Back

Throw on the scarf around your neck, but then take one side and toss it back behind you. It’s prob not the best for an exceptionally windy day since it might not stay put, but on any other cold day, go for it!

The Pull Though

Fold your scarf in half, drape it around your neck, and then take the two tails at one end and pull it through the loop. So easy!

The Loop and Tie

Welp, it sounds exactly like the description. Combine one loop with a simple knot to finish it off, and you’re all bundled up!

The Shawl

Widen out the scarf and simply lay if over your shoulders and upper arms. Chic, no?

The Extra Loose or Tight Loop

Similar to the regular loop, but, well, wrapped slightly more loose. But if that’s letting in wayyy too much cold air for you, try pulling it extra tight instead (without cutting into your windpipe, ofc).

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Alberta Ends OPEC-Style Curbs After Oil Sands Output Drops

(Bloomberg) — Alberta’s two-year experiment with OPEC-style crude production curbs is coming to an end after a Covid-driven collapse in demand led the Canadian province’s battered oil-sands industry to idle more output than required.

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A production cap of 3.81 million barrels a day will no longer be in effect in December, following months of output below that limit, the provincial government said in a statement on Friday. An increase in pipeline capacity this year also means the province is no longer struggling to store stranded crude.

“Current forecasts show that inventories are expected to remain low, with sufficient export capacity to allow the system to operate efficiently on its own well into 2021,” the Alberta government said in the statement.

Home to the world’s third-largest crude reserves, the Canadian oil sands have been hit hard by this year’s virus-driven market crash after years already struggling with insufficient pipeline capacity and competition from U.S. shale.



Athabasca Oil Sands As New Technologies Help Make Industry Profitable Again


© Bloomberg
Athabasca Oil Sands As New Technologies Help Make Industry Profitable Again

Heavy haulers at Suncor’s Millennium mine.

Photographer: Ben Nelms/Bloomberg

Alberta imposed output limits on large oil producers at the beginning of 2019 after a storage glut formed due to a pipeline shortage, causing local oil prices to plummet. The move was controversial: welcomed by some oil-sands companies such as Cenovus Energy Inc., while criticized by others including Imperial Oil Ltd. Suncor Energy Inc., the country’s biggest oil sands producer, opposed the program and welcomed the government’s decision to terminate it.

“Today’s decision contributes to the certainty, stability and simplicity producers need to operate and plan economically in a period of significant volatility,” Mark Little, chief executive officer, said in an emailed statement.

Oil’s crash prompted local producers to shut almost a million barrels a day of production earlier this year.

The government said experts don’t expect production in Western Canada to be above pipeline capacity before the middle of 2021 at the earliest, and storage levels are expected to remain low. As of the end of last week, inventories were at about 20 million barrels, according to data-provider Genscape Inc. When production limits were introduced in 2019, inventories had been approaching 40 million barrels.

The lifting of quotas could widen heavy Canadian crude’s discount to benchmark West Texas Intermediate futures to $14 to $16 a barrel as an incremental 120,000 to 150,000 barrels a day of crude production comes online, Manav Gupta, an analyst at Credit Suisse Group AG, said in a note. The discount has been near $10 for the past several months.

See Also: Heavy Oil Scarcity to Boost Canadian Oil-Sands Prices Next Year

A challenge for Alberta has been limited pipeline space for export capacity. While no new export pipelines have been built since the quotas were imposed, three major projects are under construction and existing pipelines are shipping out more oil than in the past. TC Energy Corp.’s Keystone pipeline will be able to export an additional 50,000 barrels a day next year using so-called drag resistance

‘We Lucked Out Having a Very Chill Baby’

Maren Morris Opens Up About ‘Laid-Back’ Parenting Style: ‘We Lucked Out Having a Very Chill Baby’

The musician opens up about life as a new mom.

Maren Morris is soaking in every moment of her new life as a mom.

The country star, 30, and her husband, fellow singer-songwriter Ryan Hurd, 33, welcomed their first child together, son Hayes Andrew, in March. Due to the coronavirus pandemic, Morris had to postpone her tour — but extra time with her new family of three is a silver lining.

“Even though it’s bittersweet to not be touring right now, I do feel like it’s a blessing that I get this time home for his first year of life,” Morris tells PEOPLE of baby Hayes. “So that’s been something that I actually treasure now.”

“The Bones” singer wed Hurd in 2018, five years after they met while co-writing a song for Tim McGraw. And she says he’s the perfect parenting partner.

“Ryan and I are both pretty laid back. We kind of lucked out having a very chill baby. We’re pretty chill people, so maybe that’s reflected in our kid,” says Morris. “We’re learning every day.”

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Jason Davis/Getty Maren Morris

Maren Morris/Instagram Maren Morris and Ryan Hurd

The Grammy winner and first-time mom has been reading parenting guides.

“There are habits we’re trying to break. Like, not talking to him in a high-pitched baby voice is so hard, but I don’t want to talk to him like I do my dogs,” she says of her and Hurd’s pups, June and Pancake. “I was reading a French parenting book [that said] your kid isn’t the boss, you are. That’s been a thing we’re trying to stick by.”

At 6½ months, Hayes is reaching new milestones: His diet’s expanding, and he’ll soon be mobile.

“We have started him on some baby food. He’s been pretty good with everything we’ve given him, so hopefully we don’t have a picky eater,” Morris adds. “I feel like he’s just about to start to crawl. He’s getting his butt in the air — I feel like he’s about to launch forward!”

This week, the Grammy winner will get back on stage to kick off a new virtual concert series for members of Verizon Up, Verizon’s customer loyalty program. Morris will headline a five-city remote tour, performed live from Nashville’s famed Ryman Auditorium, from Oct. 20-23. (Click here for dates and details.)

RELATED: Maren Morris on New Virtual Tour, Why All-Female Lineups Are Important: We ‘Hold Each Other Up’

Morris has also been getting back into the swing of things when it comes to songwriting and says motherhood has provided new inspiration.

“I’ve been writing a lot since my son was born, and I love songwriting — it’s my first love,” she says. “I feel a little

Alberta Ends OPEC-Style Curbs as Covid-Led Oil Sands Retreat

(Bloomberg) — Alberta’s two-year experiment with OPEC-style crude production curbs is coming to an end after a Covid-driven collapse in demand led the Canadian province’s battered oil-sands industry to idle more output than required.



a pile of snow: Heavy haulers work at the Suncor Energy Inc. Millennium mine in this aerial photograph taken above the Athabasca oil sands near Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, on Monday, Sept. 10, 2018. While the upfront spending on a mine tends to be costlier than developing more common oil-sands wells, their decades-long lifespans can make them lucrative in the future for companies willing to wait.


© Bloomberg
Heavy haulers work at the Suncor Energy Inc. Millennium mine in this aerial photograph taken above the Athabasca oil sands near Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, on Monday, Sept. 10, 2018. While the upfront spending on a mine tends to be costlier than developing more common oil-sands wells, their decades-long lifespans can make them lucrative in the future for companies willing to wait.

A cap on production that’s currently at 3.81 million barrels a day will no longer be in effect in December, with output below the limit for several months, the provincial government said in a release on Friday. An increase in pipeline capacity this year also means the province is no longer struggling to store stranded crude.

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“Current forecast show that inventories are expected to remain low, with sufficient export capacity to allow the system to operate efficiently on its own well into 2021,” the Alberta government said in the statement.

Home to the world’s third-largest crude reserves, the Canadian oil sands have been hit hard by this year’s virus-driven market crash after years already struggling with insufficient pipeline capacity and competition from U.S. shale.

Alberta imposed output limits on large oil producers at the beginning of 2019 after a storage glut formed due to a pipeline shortage, causing local oil prices to plummet. The move was controversial: welcomed by some oil-sands companies such as Cenovus Energy Inc., while criticized by others including Imperial Oil Ltd.

Oil’s crash prompted local producers to shut almost a million barrels a day of production earlier this year.

The government said experts don’t expect production in Western Canada to be above pipeline capacity before the middle of 2021 at the earliest, and storage levels are expected to remain low. As of the end of last week, inventories were at about 20 million barrels, according to data-provider Genscape Inc. When production limits were introduced in 2019, inventories had been approaching 40 million barrels.

The lifting of quotas could widen heavy Canadian crude’s discount to benchmark West Texas Intermediate futures to $14 to $16 a barrel as an incremental 120,000 to 150,000 barrels a day of crude production comes online, Manav Gupta, an analyst at Credit Suisse Group AG, said in a note. The discount has been near $10 for the past several months.

See Also: Heavy Oil Scarcity to Boost Canadian Oil-Sands Prices Next Year

A challenge for Alberta has been limited pipeline space for export capacity. While no new export pipelines have been built since the quotas were imposed, three major projects are under construction and existing pipelines are shipping out more oil than in the past. TC Energy Corp.’s Keystone pipeline will be able to export an additional 50,000 barrels a day next year using so-called drag resistance agents.

In addition, oil companies have

A Guide to Every Lampshade Style

Getty / Luthfy Prayoga / EyeEm

There are a myriad of lampshade styles on the market today, from empire and bell to drum and square. Each of these options can be beautiful in their own right, but they all have different design impacts. Depending on the look you choose, you can update existing lighting with a quick swap, says Kelly Wilkniss, the host of My Soulful Home. “Lampshades are a detail that can really freshen up your décor,” she says, adding that switching to drums is best for those looking for a modern update.

Proper sizing, however, is more important than styling (since you ultimately can’t go wrong with a lampshade so long as it speaks to your personal style). Whatever shade you choose will need to cover the “throat” of your lamp. “A shade should completely cover the inner workings of the lamp,” Wilkniss adds. “In general, the width of the shade should be two times the base of the lamp and the height should be a third of the overall height of the lamp, including the harp and bulb.” For example, a lamp that has an eight-inch base and is 30 inches tall should have a shade that is 16 inches wide and 10 inches tall. Now, back to style—figuring out which popular option to choose just got a little easier with our experts’ tips.

Related: How to Choose the Right Patio Lights for Your Space

Courtesy of Wayfair

Empire

Empire, like the dress. This classic, elegant shade is slimmer style up top and flares towards the base and looks best in Victorian- or Federal-style homes—especially pleated varieties, notes Sabine Schoenberg, the host of Ideas For Your Home on Smart Healthy Green Living. “Without the pleats, they also fit into transitional homes,” she adds.

Shop Now: Winston Porter Linen Empire Lamp Shade in Pleated Navy Blue, $54.99, wayfair.com.

Courtesy of Shades of Light

Bell

Named for the instrument, bell-shaped lampshades are more curved than empires, which stick to straight lines. Complete with romantic curved sides, these iterations are often covered with fabric and are slightly opaque. If your home has Victorian, colonial, or traditional touches, this is the lampshade for you, Schoenberg explains.

Shop Now: Shades of Light Dupioni Silk Chandelier Shade, $39, shadesoflight.com.

Courtesy of Amazon

Drum

A drum lampshade is equal in circumference all the way down (they can, however, vary in length; some are skinnier than others). They go great with Art-Deco décor and often feel more modern than their traditional counterparts. “A drum shade works well with any style and will certainly freshen up traditional décor,” notes Wilkniss, who suggests selecting the shade’s fabric based on your existing decorations. Burlap or linen creates a more casual look, she says, while silk is best for more formal interiors.

Shop Now: Alucset Handmade Paper Drum Lamp Shades, $36.99 for set of two, amazon.com.

Courtesy of Anthropologie

Rectangle and Square

These shades are either rectangle or square in nature and come in any and every size—so long

Erica Cerulo And Claire Mazur Talk The Art Of Curation And The Secrets To Finding Your Personal Style

A decade ago, before the prominence of Instagram and Pinterest, finding unique fashion and decor created by independent makers took more than just a few clicks. Consumers really had to be “in the know,” scour blogs or simply come across unique products and brands by chance. Enter Erica Cerulo and Claire Mazur, friends and business partners, who realized there wasn’t a destination on the Internet that specifically sold things you couldn’t find elsewhere.

The women met in 2002 as undergrads at the University Of Chicago. After college, they both moved to New York and came up with their initial concept. In 2010, this became Of A Kind. The brand quickly caught on. This lead to a highly lauded collaboration with Target in 2014.

The following year they sold Of A Kind to Bed Bath and Beyond, but still remained highly involved. However, by 2019, a change in management and direction from the parent company put the brand to an end. While it might be gone, it’s certainly not forgotten.

I recently spoke with Cerulo and Mazur about how they founded such an impactful company, the art of curating objects, their podcast A Thing Or Two on Dear Media, as well as what they’re doing now. 

Telling A Story Through Design

“We loved buying from young designers, people who no one had ever heard of before, when we were in school in Chicago. In the early 2000s, there was still an indie design scene there,” says Mazur. “And we wanted to replicate that experience online for people who didn’t have interesting shopping communities where they lived.”

Of A Kind worked with emerging designers to create limited edition pieces that would be posted in conjunction with a series of stories about the designer, combining content and e-commerce in an innovative way.

The site started with fashion, but once Instgram, which was also launched in 2010, became a popular social media platform, Mazur and Cerulo decided to expand the site’s offerings. “Instagram was really making people in our demographic start to care about what their homes looked like in a way that they hadn’t before,” explains Mazur. “Because all of a sudden, everybody was taking pictures of their home, people were curating their own Pinterest boards— there was a real demand for interesting home pieces.”

Finding Your Style In A Complicated World

In a very short period, our homes have become more important than ever. And without Of A Kind, finding interesting items, especially limited edition products isn’t as easy as it used to be. Once any trend becomes mainstream and everyone has a particular item or iteration of it, it becomes less interesting. The furniture and decor in our homes should reflect our personal style, but discovering what that is exactly can be a challenge.

Hailey Bieber Has a 3-Step Style Formula for a Perfect Fall Look

Hailey Bieber is well-versed in the art of transitional dressing – as she proved time and time again with her latest ‘fits. Fortunately, the Insta-girl’s trusted outfit formula for “in-between” seasons is suuuper easy to replicate.

First: dig out a flattering pair of acid-wash jeans, a statement belt, and a crisp white T-shirt. Next, throw on a floor-sweeping statement coat (a classic trench works perfectly) and some cult footwear (she favors Zoë Kravitz-approved zip-up boots from The Row). Finally, personalize your ensemble with a few key styling hacks: on this day, for example, Hailey rolled her cuffs and threw on a knitted beanie. Naturally, she also pepped up her outfit with one of her many cherished Bottega Veneta purses – this time, her chain Pouch came out to play.

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The model has brought her A-game when it comes to outerwear lately – most notably during her recent trip to New York, which gave the quintessential LA girl a chance to road-test some warmer threads with a little help from stylist Maeve Reilly. 

For a night out on the East Coast, she wore Saint Laurent’s ochre leather trench over a pair of Anthony Vaccarello’s plum wet-look trousers – while a boxy grey Lemaire wool-trill coat accompanied her to business meetings (along with a zebra-print Bottega Veneta pouch). 

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The pièce de résistance of her Manhattan wardrobe? Bottega Veneta’s butter-yellow teddy coat – complete with statement “jellyfish” tassels – that she threw over a cropped Jonathan Simkai sweater and baggy Natasha Zinko jeans. Bring on frigid winter temperatures!

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This story originally appeared in British Vogue.

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Basic builder home in Woodbury now makes personal style statement

When Melissa and Nathan Vaughn bought their builder spec home in Woodbury they were too busy to bother with much decorating. They had a newborn son, as well as two full-time jobs to juggle.

“Between feedings and naps we quickly ran to Target and shopped online, just to fill the house,” Melissa recalled.

Seven years and a second child later, the couple decided it was time for an upgrade. “We didn’t need a bigger house. We needed to use our space smarter,” said Melissa. And they wanted to put a personal stamp on the home and make it their own. “We wanted a house that reflected our style.”

At first they tried using online design services. “But we didn’t have the time or connections to manage that,” said Melissa. So they contacted Interior Impressions, Woodbury.

Interior Impressions helped the couple identify and define what they wanted their home to look and feel like. “Our typical process is we ask a ton of questions,” from how the family lives in their home to what they like to wear and do for fun, said designer/owner Amy Leferink.

The Vaughns pinned images of rooms, artwork and other objects that appealed to them to a Pinterest board. “The process helps clients home in on what they like,” said Leferink. Keywords for them were “family-friendly,” “comfortable” and “casual,” in a neutral color palette.

“She [Melissa] isn’t big on a ton of color,” Leferink said. The look is “moody, modern and monochromatic” — light and bright, with a lot of whites and grays, punctuated by darker black and charcoal accents.

The couple decided to focus first on the main-floor living area, the powder room and their bedroom. After several years of sharing the space with babies and then young children, “they were ready to reclaim the bedroom as their space — a little sanctuary,” Leferink said.

Agate-patterned wallpaper by Phillip Jeffries gave the room a more sophisticated look. “It’s hip yet restful,” said Leferink.

“I never knew I liked wallpaper,” said Melissa. “It brings it to life.”

New furniture included a tall headboard covered with tufted linen to add “a little elegance,” said Leferink.

Kid-proof living room

In the living room, “they wanted it to be more personal, inviting and homey,” said Leferink. The couple had moved in with accumulated furniture pieces that didn’t necessarily complement each other or fit the scale of the room. “They were ready to step it up a notch,” she said.

A new sectional, chaise and leather ottoman give the room a more polished, updated look that’s also family-friendly. “We wanted a great sofa everyone could pile on, in a kid-proof fabric they didn’t have to worry about,” said Leferink. “They can put their feet up and be comfortable.” A pair of accent chairs add extra seating for when the family is entertaining.

The agate wallpaper used in the bedroom also was applied to the back of a bookshelf “to give it more interest,” said Leferink. They also replaced the basic

Style Invitational Week 1407: Your ad space (or space ad) here

Ooh, we’ll help you think about it, companies! This week: Come up with an idea for promoting some commercial product or service (a) in space, (b) in a prison, (c) at a kindergarten, (d) by a football team or (e) in the White House. While the astronauts won’t be using the products or endorsing them as such, we know it won’t take 5 billion years for that to happen; go ahead and assume that the people there can use the product, sing a jingle, whatever.

Submit up to 25 entries at wapo.st/enter-invite-1407 (no capitals in the Web address). Deadline is Monday, Nov. 2 (why, you think you’ll have something else on your mind that day?); results will appear Nov. 22 in print, Nov. 19 online.

Winner gets the Lose Cannon, our Style Invitational trophy — or possibly its replacement (TBA). Second place receives the best promotional stuffed mascot we’ve offered since Fleet’s Eneman: It’s Petey P. Cup, a cuddly toy urine-sample beaker complete with little splashy-looking yellow sides, representing cuddly HealthPartners insurance. Donated by 48-time Loser Marleen May.

The Style Conversational: The Empress’s weekly online column discusses each new contest and set of results. See this week’s, published late afternoon Thursday, Oct. 22, at wapo.st/conv1407.

ReviSitcoms: Updated TV plots from Week 1403

In Week 1403 we asked you to describe an episode of a past or current TV show updated for our current age. Many Losers suggested plots for “The Invaders” or other ET shows in which the aliens take one look and hurry back into the mother ship.

4th place:

Marcus Welby, M.D.: “I wish I could save your husband, Mrs. Johnson, but — oops, no more Obamacare.” (Jon Gearhart, Des Moines)

3rd place:

The Beverly Hillbillies: The California wildfires threaten the Clampett mansion. Elly May flees to the cement pond, where she’s rescued by 600 firemen. (Allen Breon, Clarksville, Md.)

2nd place

and the tongue-sticking-out face mask:
Tonight on MacGyver, the world hangs in the balance trying to find a way to protect itself from covid-19. But Angus faces his most daunting challenge yet: He has only a square of cloth and two elastic bands. (Sue Lin Chong, Baltimore)

And the winner of the Lose Cannon:

All in the Family: After a change of heart, the bigoted guy from Queens lets his meathead son-in-law be in charge of everything. (Brendan Beary, Great Mills, Md.)

Dreck to TV: Honorable mentions

Candid Camera: The president thinks he’s on the phone with Vladimir Putin, but it’s really Sacha Baron Cohen. “Smile!” (Jeffrey Schamis, Washington, a First Offender)

Friends: Furloughed during the pandemic, the gang moves into an even more luxurious apartment and has more disposable income. (Mike Gips, Bethesda, Md.)

The Brady Bunch misses out on first place in the neighborhood talent show with their imitation of a Zoom call because Alice doesn’t realize she is on mute. (Mike Phillips, Chevy Chase, Md.)

Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Our undead-battling heroine meets her match when Stephen Miller moves to town. (Duncan

‘New-style’ offenses have sparked scoring surge

The style of offense the teams ran is vastly different than the traditional run-heavy flexbone or wishbone offenses that high schools commonly used just over a decade ago.

And many teams around the state are doing the same.

“I’ve been doing this for 18 years,” Bishop McGuinness coach Bryan Pierce said. “Back in 2004, we were just running it down people’s throats and I think we threw the ball maybe five times a game. Now through the transition, I’ve just grown with the game and you just see how much different it is through the passing aspect of it.”

More and more coaches have seen the advantage of spreading players out, throwing quick passes and performing simple plays. It has caught fire in the college ranks, finally even coming into vogue in the run-happy SEC. NFL teams have adopted some of the spread, and now, high schools are widely adopting the style, which causes the percentage of the big one-play score to rise.

“You get really good athletes out there in space and you get them the ball, they can make one guy miss and go,” George said. “In the old traditional days, you’re running in between the tackles and there’s three or four guys that might get a shot on you.”

The birth of the run-pass-option has given defenses trouble throughout the years. In the more traditional offense, defenses had an easier time tackling because every player was nearly stacked on top of each other. The offenses have adapted to avoid that.

“Now the idea is to spread people out and let your athletes be athletes,” Atchison said. “When you put them in a box and in a confined space they can’t do as many things. But when you spread people out and get that guy in space, that’s where it makes you hurt.”

The new-age style has not only given teams the big-play ability but also allowed them to run a lot more plays.

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