Annual shopping fundraiser, the Partners Card, worries about sales in a pandemic

Ten days are coming up in Dallas that could make a huge difference for “nonessential” retailers forced to temporarily close last spring and for a nonprofit that’s been helping victims of family violence since 1978.

Retailers are trying to make up lost sales and salvage a year that brought new challenges to operating a store. About 550 retail locations in the Dallas area have signed up to be part of the Partners Card, about 100 fewer than last year.

At the same time, The Family Place, a program that benefits victims of family violence, is counting on the Partners Card, its largest annual fundraiser, to bring in $1 million again this year.

The Partners Card costs $75 and gives card holders a 20% discount starting Oct. 30 through Nov. 8 at the participating stores, many of which are local retailers such as Stanley Korshak, BabyBliss, Saint Bernard, Christy M Boutique, Eiseman Jewels and Nicholson-Hardie Garden Center. The list includes several national chains, including Nike, Orvis, Tumi and Vineyard Vines.

The discount card, which has been around for 28 years, has evolved with consumers. The card is now also available online and accessible on a mobile phone with a searchable list and a map that pops up nearby locations.

It’s not just the store owners who benefit, said Paige Flink, CEO and creator of the Partners Card. Many of their employees earn commissions on sales, and their incomes have been hurt this year too, she said.

“We know it’s the biggest week for many stores, even bigger than Christmas,” she said. But because fewer locations are participating this year, Flink admits she’s a little worried about card sales, which range from 10,000 to 15,000 a year.

Volunteers sell cards to their friends, but most cards are sold by the retailers, she said.

“The Partners Card is a Dallas traditional every year around Halloween,” said Joanne Teichman, managing director of Ylang 23. “And it brings awareness of domestic violence, and this year, there’s more of a need for what the Family Place does.”

The jewelry store in the Plaza at Preston Center is a longtime Partners Card retailer and springs for a billboard on the Dallas North Tollway every year to promote it.

Many aren't making the daily commute to work on the Dallas North Tollway because of the COVID-19 pandemic, but this familiar billboard prominently placed by Dallas jewelry retailer Ylang 23 will be up next week as it has for years to promote the start of The Family Place Partners Card.
Many aren’t making the daily commute to work on the Dallas North Tollway because of the COVID-19 pandemic, but this familiar billboard prominently placed by Dallas jewelry retailer Ylang 23 will be up next week as it has for years to promote the start of The Family Place Partners Card.(Ylang 23)
Partners Card CEO Paige Flink is shown at the Plaza at Preston Center with Alysa Teichman (left), vice president business development at Ylang 23 and Joanne Teichman (right), managing director of Ylang 23. Partners Card is a huge annual fundraiser for The Family Place, but it s also a major sales event for retailers in Dallas, who sign up to give card holders a 20% discount for 10 days as they begin to do their holiday shopping.
Partners Card CEO Paige Flink is shown at the Plaza at Preston Center with Alysa Teichman (left), vice president business development at Ylang 23 and Joanne Teichman (right), managing director of Ylang 23. Partners Card is a huge annual fundraiser for The Family Place, but it s also a major sales event for retailers in Dallas, who sign up to give card holders a 20% discount for 10 days as they begin to do their holiday shopping.

In sudden fashion, Trojans, Longhorns ready for 52nd annual clash

While not always a telltale sign of things to come, it’s happened enough to warrant an inquisitive response from someone who learns of the football facts between these two rivals.

Those facts are that more often than not when South Houston defeats Dobie, the Trojans go to the state playoffs.

Over the last 25 years, it has happened in 1995, 1996, 2007, 2016 and 2017. In 2008, South Houston did defeat Dobie and didn’t qualify for the postseason, while on the flip side, Dobie did beat South Houston in 2011 and the Trojans still managed to earn a playoff berth.

But there’s no denying we have a pattern here, a pattern we’ll see if it happens again when South Houston and Dobie collide for the 52nd annual showdown at Veterans Memorial Stadium for a 6 p.m. kickoff Thursday night.

As many are aware, the game has suddenly been thrust upon the two respective coaching staffs after Channelview reported covid-19 cases in its program, prompting the district to do a flip-flop of Week 10 and Week 5. So while the Falcons self-quarantine, the district is using their Week 10 bye date to make it an easy fix for this weekend.


“We were supposed to play Dobie Week 10, now we’re playing them Week 5. Dobie’s a really good team, a really good program. Coach Kevin Berneathy does a very good job over there. We had a short week to get ready, playing on Thursday. We were supposed to play Deer Park on Friday. That’s the beauty of sports, you’ve got to deal with adversity, you’ve got to be ready to change on the fly. The kids have had a good week, so we’ll be ready tomorrow night,” South Houston head coach Patrick Longstreet said.

Dobie’s method of operation on offense won’t be any different from years past. They’re going to call for a ton of running assignments. In 2018 and 2019, Dobie led the district, averaging 363 yards per game in 2018 and 278 last year. Needless to say, Dobie’s passing attack has ranked near the bottom of the district those two years, averaging under 100 yards.

Cameron Gray will be Dobie’s probable starting quarterback. He was the team’s second-leading rusher last year with 421 yards and nine touchdowns. But the ground attack did lose their top rusher in Dontavion Crosby, a First Team All-District selection.

“They’re playing really good football right now. It’ll be a challenge for us but it’ll be a chance to measure ourselves where we stand as a program. If we want to be one of the four teams fighting for the playoffs, what a great opportunity this will be,” Longstreet said.

The Trojans will counter with their freshman quarterback in Kam’ron Webb, who is coming off his first stellar contest during a 34-0 win over Pasadena. Kendrick Banks will also be behind center.

The one thing South Houston can’t do is draw penalty after penalty like they were doing for the opening half and the first

4th annual Women’s March draws protesters across the country

Thousands of protesters took part in women’s marches on Saturday, with a main event in Washington, D.C., and sister marches taking place across the country.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: With the U.S Capitol in the background, demonstrators march on Pennsylvania Av. during the Women's March in Washington, Oct. 17, 2020.


© Jose Luis Magana/AP
With the U.S Capitol in the background, demonstrators march on Pennsylvania Av. during the Women’s March in Washington, Oct. 17, 2020.

Organizers had anticipated 116,000 in-person and virtual participants. They said tens of thousands showed up at what turned out to be 438 #CountonUs marches across all 50 states.

Actions were planned in key swing states including “a march for Black lives lost in Milwaukee, Wisconsin,” a “Feminist Icon Costume Party in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania,” and a “golf cart parade at The Villages, Florida,” according to organizers.

Women’s march protests have taken place every year since the first drew more than a million to various locations the day after the inauguration of President Donald Trump.

This year’s goal was to ensure that the 1.25 million women on the organization’s list vote and bring three friends.

“Women showed up in force on day 1 of Trump’s presidency for the first Women’s March, and now we’re mobilizing to finish what we started,” Rachel O’Leary Carmona, the executive director of Women’s March said in a statement. “Trump’s presidency began with women taking to the streets, and that’s how it’s going to end.”

MORE: Women’s March 2019: Everything you need to know


a group of people walking in front of a crowd: With the U.S Capitol in the background, demonstrators march on Pennsylvania Av. during the Women's March in Washington, Oct. 17, 2020.


© Jose Luis Magana/AP
With the U.S Capitol in the background, demonstrators march on Pennsylvania Av. during the Women’s March in Washington, Oct. 17, 2020.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: People take part in the 2020 Women's March next to the New York Stock Exchange in New York City, Oct. 17, 2020.


© Eduardo Munoz/Reuters
People take part in the 2020 Women’s March next to the New York Stock Exchange in New York City, Oct. 17, 2020.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: People march during the Women's March in downtown Chicago, Oct. 17, 2020.


© Nam Y. Huh/AP
People march during the Women’s March in downtown Chicago, Oct. 17, 2020.



a group of people holding a sign: People take part in a Power Together Women's March, Oct. 17, 2020, in Nashville, Tenn.


© Mark Humphrey/AP
People take part in a Power Together Women’s March, Oct. 17, 2020, in Nashville, Tenn.



a group of people posing for the camera: Dressed as handmaids, protesters attend the Women's March at Freedom Plaza on Oct. 17, 2020, in Washington.


© Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images
Dressed as handmaids, protesters attend the Women’s March at Freedom Plaza on Oct. 17, 2020, in Washington.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Demonstrators rally during the Women's March at Freedom Plaza, Oct. 17, 2020, in Washington.


© Jose Luis Magana/AP
Demonstrators rally during the Women’s March at Freedom Plaza, Oct. 17, 2020, in Washington.



a man and a woman looking at the camera: A woman wears a face mask with images of late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as people take part in the 2020 Women's March at Washington Square park in New York City, Oct. 17, 2020.


© Eduardo Munoz/Reuters
A woman wears a face mask with images of late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as people take part in the 2020 Women’s March at Washington Square park in New York City, Oct. 17, 2020.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: People participate in a nationwide Women's March in honor of the late late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before the 2020 election, in Washington, Oct. 17, 2020.


© Erin Scott/Reuters
People participate in a nationwide Women’s March in honor of the late late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before the 2020 election, in Washington, Oct. 17, 2020.



a person holding a sign posing for the camera: People rally during the Women's March at Freedom Plaza, Oct. 17, 2020, in Washington.


© Jose Luis Magana/AP
People rally during the Women’s March at Freedom Plaza, Oct. 17, 2020, in Washington.



a group of people walking in front of a crowd: Demonstrators gather to take part in the nationwide Women's March on Oct. 17, 2020, at Freedom Plaza in Washington.


© Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images
Demonstrators gather to take part in the nationwide Women’s March on Oct. 17, 2020, at Freedom Plaza in Washington.



a man holding a sign: People gather for the Women's March in Freedom Plaza, in Washington, Oct. 17, 2020.


© GAMAL DIAB/EPA via Shutterstock
People gather for the Women’s March in Freedom Plaza, in Washington, Oct. 17, 2020.

Video: Protesters gather at Freedom Plaza for Washington’s women’s march (AFP)

Protesters gather at Freedom Plaza for Washington’s women’s march