Corstorphine Hill incident: police confirm blood on piece of clothing found is from an animal

The blood-stained item found on Tuesday morning sparked investigations after it was spotted in Corsorphine Hill, Edinburgh.

Multiple police cars and vans were in attendance searching the area for any clues related to the suspicious garment which was taken to a laboratory for further examination.

Police have now confirmed that the item of clothing has animal blood on it and “no criminality was involved.”

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Corstorphine Hill in Edinburgh, and a picture of a police car at the scene on Tuesday when investigations were being carried out picture: JPI Media
Corstorphine Hill in Edinburgh, and a picture of a police car at the scene on Tuesday when investigations were being carried out picture: JPI Media

A police spokeswoman said: “Officers were called to Corstorphine Hill, Edinburgh after a blood-stained item of clothing was found by a member of the public.

“The item was analysed and it has now been confirmed that the blood is from an animal.

“No criminality is involved and our enquiries are now complete.

“Officers would like to thank members of the public who contacted police with information regarding this matter.”

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Blood, axe recovered from scene of jewelry store robbery, trial hears

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“I was mistaken about that,” said Wulff, who is seen hugging the employee after she got back up, the scene playing out just seconds after the axe- and shotgun-wielding masked intruders had fled with a bag of loot that included watches.

Weber asked Wulff what his purpose had been in advising his colleagues not to touch anything. Wulff replied that he’d been in the jewelry business the past 40 years, his parents ran a jewelry business and his sister had once been robbed at gunpoint.

Houry Ashekian, co-owner of the family-run business in a shopping plaza, testified she was busy at the front of the business and didn’t look up when the robbers entered. But one of the two female employees she was with gasped, “‘Oh my gosh!’ I looked up and there was a man with a gun.”

The other two responded immediately to the gunman’s order for them to get down on the floor. Ashekian said she froze until one of the other women “told me, ‘Get down! Get down!’ — that’s when I went down.”

Ashekian recalls hearing yelling and and the sound of glass display cases smashing. Earlier evidence showed the two suspects were in and out in under three minutes, after which Ashekian’s husband and co-owner called 911. Police officers were on the scene within minutes.

“Nobody touched anything as far as I can remember,” Ashekian said. Referring to the same bit of videotape, however, she recalled a small planter fallen on the floor that might have been what she was reaching down for to pick up off the floor, but she testified she wasn’t sure.

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Blood and tears as Israeli police storm wedding during lockdown

An Israeli wedding in a settlement outside Jerusalem ended with a bloody fight and sobbing guests after police stormed in to break it up, accusing the family of breaking coronavirus lockdown rules.



a large building: Photograph: Ammar Awad/Reuters


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Ammar Awad/Reuters

Footage of police dragging the bride’s brother out a house, blood streaming down his face as he is escorted past a white cloth table set with flowers, has led to outrage in the government, and an investigation has been opened.

The family, who live in the occupied West Bank settlement of Givat Ze’ev, accused officers of attacking guests at the celebration on Wednesday night, and said they had been respecting lockdown regulations that limit gatherings to 20 people.

Police said an officer was attacked by the woman who owns the house after she was asked to present identification, at which point other guests began throwing “glass oil bottles” at the unit.

Police said they arrested the man with the bloodied face in the video, after he threw oil and then slipped on it. “During the arrest, both an officer and the suspect slipped on the oil and was injured by the broken glass,” the police said in a statement.



a rocky beach: Settlement buildings around Givat Ze’ev in the Israeli-occupied West Bank.


© Photograph: Ammar Awad/Reuters
Settlement buildings around Givat Ze’ev in the Israeli-occupied West Bank.

Video: Conflict leading up to gunfire shows man spray a chemical agent at another man with a drawn handgun (The Independent)

Conflict leading up to gunfire shows man spray a chemical agent at another man with a drawn handgun

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A police spokesman, Micky Rosenfeld, told the Guardian that the bottles were filled with olive oil. Blurred bodycam footage published by the police showed guests arguing with officers before a scuffle erupted.

The incident led to an outcry from some Israeli politicians, with the interior minister, Aryeh Deri, tweeting: “There is no reason in the world for police to break in with rifles in hand and harm people.” Deri, who like the wedding attendees is a member of the country’s Jewish ultra-Orthodox community, demanded an investigation.

The public security minister, Amir Ohana, who is responsible for the police, promised to look into the matter personally. “They are indeed difficult and unfortunate pictures,” he said of the footage.

Israel’s government imposed a second national lockdown on 18 September after infection rates rose to some of the highest in the world. Some ultra-Orthodox communities have been accused of ignoring the rules, leading at times to confrontations with police.

The national shutdown, which includes settlements in the Palestinian territories, has been extended until Sunday.

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