Sarah Sanders: ‘Vicious’ attacks on Amy Coney Barrett show what Democrats think of women

This is a rush transcript from “Hannity” September 22, 2020. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated.

SEAN HANNITY, FOX NEWS HOST:  All right. Tucker Carlson, thank you. Great show as always. 

Welcome to HANNITY. 

We begin with the FOX News alert. 

The president now still holding a huge rally in the important battleground state of Pennsylvania, the first of two major campaign events this week in the state.

Let’s dip in as the president seems like he’s closing out now.

DONALD TRUMP, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:  — where now we get the same prices, all these nations that are paying a tiny fraction, which should have been instituted a long time ago and the drug companies are going after me with those ads, oh, it’s terrible, it’s terrible. 

You know why? Just every time you see an ad from the drug company — they got plenty of money, that’s why nobody ever fights them. Anytime you see an ad from a drug company, just remember one thing, your drug prices are coming down. That’s what it means. That’s what it means.

(CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

We will strongly protect Medicare and Social Security and we will always protect patients. We will protect every single patient.

America will land, by the way, the first woman on the moon, and the United States will be the first nation to land an astronaut on Mars. 

You know, NASA was an absolute disaster. Grass was growing through the fairways, too. They had fairways. That’s about all they used with the fairway. 

And now we have something right through the runways, the landing strips was all grass-infested, it was all weed-infested. And now, it’s the number one space center in the world by far. It was a closed-up mess. 

(CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

And we have rich guys sending up rockets, Elon and others, they send up rockets and we say, let them keep going, let them keep spending money on these rockets. They love rockets. 

We will stop the radical indoctrination of our students and restore patriotic education to (INAUDIBLE). 

(CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

We will teach our children to love our country, honor our history and always respect our great American flag.

(CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

And we will live by the timeless words in our national motto — in God we trust.

(CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

For years, you had a president who apologized for America, now you have a president who is standing up for America and standing up for the people of Pennsylvania like nobody has ever stood up before.

(CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

So, get your friends, get your family, get your neighbors and your co- workers, and get out and vote.

(CHEERS AND APPLAUSE)

And early voting — if you didn’t know it, has already begun, and watch it and watch those fake ballots. You got to go out and turn them in. If they –
– you see somebody cheating, you got to turn them

Local Eats: Year-round food truck has Flint-style coney dogs and other good stuff

FLINT, MI — The Eats and Sweets food truck in Flint has delicious American fare and the staple Flint-style coney dog.

Before customers step foot outside their vehicles, they’re bound to smell the aromas of Polish sausages, hamburgers, walking tacos, tacos and the coney dog with onion, cheese and the red sauce – better known as the Flint-style coney dog.

“I’ve loved cooking all my life,” said Janarvis Tyler, Eats and Sweets food truck owner.

Tyler noted he cooked often for his family while growing up. At some point Tyler owned a nightclub, which housed a restaurant where he would cook, he said.

The business owner, inspired to keep doing what he loves, opened his food truck two years ago and works to serve food from the truck year-round.

In the warmer months, fair food such as cotton candy, slushies and lemonade is added to the menu. Specialty pound cake is available to customers through every season.

Soon customers will be able to purchase a loaded baked potato, according to Tyler, who is planning to add it to the menu.

The business is open from noon to 7 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.

Eats and Sweets is located at 2002 Fenton Road in Flint.

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Sen. Martha McSally meets with Amy Coney Barrett, will vote to confirm her

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Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett (right) meets with Sen. Martha McSally, R-Ariz., on Oct. 21, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett (right) meets with Sen. Martha McSally, R-Ariz., on Oct. 21, 2020, on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. (Photo: Greg Nash/AP)

Sen. Martha McSally met privately Wednesday with President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett and later said she would enthusiastically vote to confirm her.

Trump and GOP senators are moving to confirm Barrett to the Supreme Court on Monday with a vote that is expected to deliver a 6-3 conservative majority on the court by Election Day. 

Democrats have wanted to hold off on filling the high court vacancy left by the Sept. 18 death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg until after voters decide the presidential race on Nov. 3, but Republicans narrowly control the Senate and are moving quickly.

On Wednesday, after meeting with the judge, McSally, who is on Arizona’s ballot this year and is considered an endangered senator, said she was impressed with Barrett.

“I just met with Judge Barrett and I am so inspired by her,” McSally said during a news conference after her meeting. “This truly is her calling and she is a gift to our country when she is confirmed to serve on the Supreme Court.”

She made the remarks as she joined Republican Sens. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, Joni Ernst of Iowa, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and others to oppose any efforts to expand the Supreme Court, as some Democrats have called for. 

“We cannot allow one extreme element to fundamentally destroy and transform our institutions like this,” McSally said. 

McSally later told The Arizona Republic that Barrett is “in person, exactly the kind of brilliant, thoughtful, gracious, humble, unflappable woman” Americans saw during her recent confirmation hearings. The one-on-one was the first time McSally and Barrett had met. 

McSally said she spoke with Barrett about how she came to her judicial philosophy, “which I strongly agree with and support, that she’s on the bench not to interpret the Constitution and the laws the way she wants them interpreted … but the way they were written.”

McSally said she told Barrett she was “a gift to America — I told her that, I actually got a little choked up when I said that to her, but she really is a gift to our country for this moment in time. I’m really proud to support her.” 

McSally initially expressed her support for Barrett shortly after Trump announced her as his Supreme Court pick in late September.

Barrett’s nomination to the court gives McSally and other Republicans the opportunity to remind Republican voters of the dozens of conservative judges they have confirmed to the federal bench during Trump’s first term.

McSally said she would vote to confirm Barrett on Tuesday in an opinion piece for The Arizona Republic that centered on the judge’s personal biography and professional qualifications.

Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, a moderate Arizona Democrat who has voted for some of Trump’s more controversial judicial and Cabinet nominees, is scheduled to speak with Barrett later

Two Women Confront Lindsey Graham in Airport Over Amy Coney Barrett Nomination

Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC) released a video on Monday showing two women confronting him at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport in Virginia about the nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. The airport is a 10-minute drive from Washington.

Graham is chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee and is presiding over the confirmation process. He’s been a staunch ally of President Donald Trump and is a certain vote to put Barrett on the court.

In the video, which appears to have been recorded by one of Graham’s staff, the senator asks the women where they’re from and says he will confirm Barrett to the court.

“I arrived in DC today & was confronted by 2 women – one of whom was from Seattle – who called Judge Amy Coney Barrett a racist & unqualified,” Graham tweeted.

“This is the modern left, hostile & unhinged. I won’t be intimidated. I can’t wait to #FillTheSeat.”

“STAND WITH ME,” Graham wrote and included a link to donate to his re-election campaign.

Graham has made several appeals for funds since finding himself in a surprisingly close race with Democrat Jaime Harrison, who has raised a record-breaking sum as he seeks to unseat the incumbent.

In the video, a woman wearing a mask approaches Graham and appears to be recording him with her phone. She says “Look me in the eye…”

“Where are you from?” Graham asks. The woman replies that she’s from Seattle, and continues to speak before another woman can be heard asking: “Why does it matter where she’s from? She’s American.”

“I believe Seattle’s a good example of how things are getting out of control,” Graham says.

“No, Seattle is wonderful,” the first woman says, while the second woman tells Graham: “Sir, you’re an example of how things are getting out of control, sir.”

Graham and his staff walk away from the women, who follow them up as they head upstairs.

“You work for me, sir,” the woman goes on. “I pay your salary, sir.”

At that point, Graham turns to the woman and asks: “Where are you from?”

“It doesn’t matter where I’m from,” she says. “I’m from the United States of America, sir, where are you from?”

“I’m just off the plane,” Graham says.

“You sure are,” the woman says. “And you’re gonna make my children, my daughter, who stood on the shoulders of giants, you’re gonna take their rights away, by voting for this woman [Barrett] who’s a racist?”

The woman is referring to the possibility that Barrett would deliver the crucial vote to overturn the landmark abortion ruling Roe v. Wade. There is no evidence Barrett is racist but there have been criticisms of her decision not to say whether racism is systemic.

“Well I’m enthusiastically gonna support Judge Barrett,” Graham says as one of the women tries to argue about women’s rights. The other speaks over her, asking him “Why?”

“Because she’s highly qualified,” Graham

Nationwide Women’s March Protests Donald Trump, Amy Coney Barrett

Thousands of people in masks rallied Saturday in Washington D.C. to protest President Donald Trump and his nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to fill the seat of late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

The rally resembled that of January 2017, when young women and gender minorities across the country gathered to protest the president’s inauguration.

Rachel O’Leary Carmona, executive director of Women’s March, kicked off the rally by asking attendees to maintain their distance from one another, adding that the only “superspreader event” would be the recent one at the White House. “His presidency began with women marching and now it’s going to end with woman voting. Period,” said Carmona.

Reproductive rights activist Sonja Spoo echoed Carmona, saying “there is no choice” but to vote Trump out of office. “We are the hell and the high water. Donald Trump is leaving office, and there is no choice for him,” she said. “Come Nov. 3, it will because of women – especially Black, brown and Indigenous women – stepping up and saying enough.”

According to a statement on the Women’s March website, organizers hope to “send an unmistakable message about the fierce opposition to Trump and his agenda, including his attempt to fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat.”

The organization, with the help of demonstrators, also plans on sending over five million text messages, asking female voters to take action in the upcoming election.

Other rallies were organized from New York to San Francisco to signal opposition to Trump’s push to fill the seat of the late Justice Ginsburg before Election Day.

Trump nominated Barrett last month following the death of the late justice, and her confirmation hearings took place this past week. The Senate Judiciary Committee is expected to vote on Barrett’s confirmation on Oct. 22.

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Women’s March Protesters Rally Against President Trump and Amy Coney Barrett

Women’s Marches are taking place in hundreds of American cities on Saturday, including New York City and Washington, D.C., as protesters rally against President Trump and his latest Supreme Court nominee, Amy Coney Barrett.

Marchers are also focused on a few contentious topics, including abortion.  Washington Post reporter Samantha Schmidt captured the back-and-forth between Women’s March protesters and anti-abortion protesters on video from D.C., which you can see below:

As Women’s March protesters reach the Supreme Court, they stand face to face with anti-abortion demonstrators. pic.twitter.com/CTCXIqXOU9

— Samantha Schmidt (@schmidtsam7) October 17, 2020

Also Read: Maher Says There Are Already Too Many Catholics on the Supreme Court (Video)

Women’s March attendees are also voicing their displeasure with the president and calling on citizens to vote in the upcoming election. The march comes as the Senate moves closer to confirming Coney Barrett as Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s replacement on the Supreme Court’s bench, following Ginsburg’s death last month.

Ginsburg was prominently featured on many signs at the marches, including one in New York City that said, “Vote, and tell ‘em Ruth sent you!” Some protesters in D.C., meanwhile, were decked out in outfits from “The Handmaid’s Tale” while carrying signs that said, “Trump/Pence OUT NOW!”

Masks bearing the phrases “F— Trump” and “Black Lives Matter,” among others, were sported by some protesters.

Women's March D.C. Handmaid's TaleWomen's March D.C. Handmaid's Tale

Women’s March D.C. Handmaid’s Tale

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Saturday’s linchpin march in Washington D.C. comes as the city continues to impose stiff measures on residents to prevent the spread of COVID-19. NPR reported the Washington march was permitted to have up to 10,000 attendees.

Also Read: Joy Behar: Amy Coney Barrett’s Empty Notepad Just Means ‘Empty Answers’ (Video)

“Women are going to decide this election,” Rachel O’Leary Carmona, executive director of the Women’s March, told the Washington Post. “We are fired up. We are ready to take action. This is a preview of what you’re going to see on November 3rd.”

Other marches are planned to kick off on the West Coast and throughout the U.S. on Saturday, including in downtown Los Angeles.

Read original story Women’s March Protesters Rally Against President Trump and Amy Coney Barrett At TheWrap

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Hundreds Gather for Women’s March in D.C. to Protest Trump, Amy Coney Barrett Nomination

DANIEL SLIM/AFP via Getty Images

Hundreds gathered in Washington, D.C. on Saturday for a Women’s March in protest of President Donald Trump and his nomination of Amy Coney Barrett for the Supreme Court.

In addition to the Washington demonstration, more than 429 other marches — some socially distanced and others virtual — are expected to take place across the country Saturday. Over 116,000 people have pledged to participate in the demonstrations.

“The first Women’s March in 2017 was historic,” Rachel Carmona, executive director of Women’s March, said at the Washington rally, according to USA Today. “Now four years later … with 17 days to go [until the election], we’re going to finish what we started.”

With the help of demonstrators, the group also hopes to send out 5 million text messages, urging female voters to make their voices heard in the upcoming election, according to the Washington Post. 

Amy Harris/Shutterstock

Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

RELATED: Who Is Donald Trump’s Supreme Court Nominee? Everything to Know About Amy Coney Barrett

On their website, Women’s March said the demonstrations are meant to “send an unmistakable message about the fierce opposition to Trump and his agenda, including his attempt to fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat.”

Trump nominated Barrett for the Supreme Court last month following the death of Justice Ginsburg, and her confirmation hearings took place this past week. The Senate Judiciary Committee is expected to vote on Barrett’s confirmation on Oct. 22.

If appointed, Barrett could cement a six-to-three conservative majority on the court for years to come, with potentially sweeping influence over decisions about healthcare, abortion access and other issues.

DANIEL SLIM/AFP via Getty Images

At the Saturday rally in D.C., reproductive rights activist Sonja Spoo said “there is no choice” but to vote Trump out of office in the upcoming election.

“We are the hell and the high water. Donald Trump is leaving office, and there is no choice for him,” Spoo, director of Reproductive Rights Campaigns at women’s advocacy group UltraViolet, said. “Come Nov. 3, it will because of women – especially Black, brown and Indigenous women – stepping up and saying enough.”

RELATED: Why Supreme Court Nominee Amy Coney Barrett Deflected Questions About How She Would Rule

March participant Kelsey Weir told the Washington Post that she felt it was her duty to attend.

“Women are threatened in a world where a Christian theocracy is threatening to take over,” she said. “This is the crisis for our world. The next few weeks are going to decide so many things for women.”

In addition to the Women’s March event, conservative nonprofit organization Independent Women’s Forum hosted its second-annual “March for All Women” as a counter protest. The event was called “I’m With Her!,” according to the organization’s website, and held near the Supreme Court to show support for Barrett.

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Women’s March 2020 to protest Trump, Amy Coney Barrett nomination

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Nearly four years after millions of people worldwide protested the first day of President Donald Trump’s tenure, hundreds rallied in Washington, D.C., and marched to the National Mall on Saturday as thousands more joined virtual protests intended to galvanize voters ahead of Election Day.

More than 116,000 people with Women’s March were expected to march or participate in other actions on Saturday, and more than 429 socially distanced and virtual sister marches were expected to take place in all 50 states, according to Women’s March organizers.

“The first Women’s March in 2017 was historic,” Rachel Carmona, executive director of Women’s March, said in a rally before the march Saturday afternoon in Washington, D.C. “Now four years later … with 17 days to go (until the election), we’re going to finish what we started.”

The march in Washington was planned to culminate at the National Mall where organizers hoped to hold a virtual text banking telethon to send 5 million text messages to encourage people to vote. March organizers said they planned to honor the legacy of Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and contest Amy Coney Barrett’s confirmation to the court, which the Senate Judiciary Committee is expected to vote on Oct. 22.

“We are the hell and the high water. Donald Trump is leaving office, and there is no choice for him,” Sonja Spoo, director of Reproductive Rights Campaigns at women’s advocacy group UltraViolet, said at the rally. “Come Nov. 3, it will because of women – especially Black, brown and Indigenous women – stepping up and saying enough.”

‘We are not resting’: Women’s March draws thousands, brings ‘renewed energy’ to start new decade

Demonstrators gather to take part in the nationwide Women's March on October 17, 2020, at Freedom Plaza in Washington, DC.

Demonstrators gather to take part in the nationwide Women’s March on October 17, 2020, at Freedom Plaza in Washington, DC. (Photo: Daniel Slim, AFP via Getty Images)

Women’s March said all participants would be required to wear a mask and social distance and that hand sanitizer would be available. The organization requested that participants not travel to D.C. from states on the district’s quarantine list.

Meanwhile, the Independent Women’s Forum, a conservative American nonprofit, hosted its second-annual “March for All Women” counter-protest. This year’s event, called the “I’m With Her!” rally, took place near the Supreme Court to support Barrett’s nomination. The in-person rally would be limited to 100 people due to COVID-19 safety measures but would also be livestreamed, according to the forum.

“We believe Amy Coney Barrett bottom line should be treated with respect,” Carrie Lukas, president of the Independent Women’s Forum, said to the crowd, according to the livestream. “She is a great American, and you’ll find out what that means as she stands up for all of us.”

The first Women’s March on Jan. 21, 2017, was the largest single-day protest in U.S. history, according to the Crowd Counting Consortium. That day, the crowd estimator pegged nationwide participation in the 650-plus sister marches at 3.3 million to 5.3 million.

Subsequent marches

Amy Coney Barrett Nomination is Mitch McConnell’s Deadly Gift to an Ailing NRA

The National Rifle Association and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell both got serious about politics in 1977. That May, a coup at the NRA led to the installation of a new president who was determined to turn the organization from a sportsmen’s association into a political kingmaker. Five months later, McConnell won his first political contest, becoming the county executive of Louisville, Kentucky.



a person looking at the camera: Seventh U.S. Circuit Court Judge Amy Coney Barrett (L), President Donald Trump's nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, meets with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) as she begins a series of meetings to prepare for her confirmation hearing, on Capitol Hill on September 29, 2020 in Washington, DC.


© Susan Walsh-Pool/Getty
Seventh U.S. Circuit Court Judge Amy Coney Barrett (L), President Donald Trump’s nominee for the U.S. Supreme Court, meets with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) as she begins a series of meetings to prepare for her confirmation hearing, on Capitol Hill on September 29, 2020 in Washington, DC.

Over the next 43 years, McConnell and the NRA grew into political institutions—and they did it with help from each other. All told, the NRA has poured $1.3 million into McConnell’s Senate campaigns. The organization also helped him amass power in Congress, spending more than $20 million in 2014 to elect a Republican majority to the Senate, and $50 million more in 2016 to hold that majority and elect Donald Trump. For his part, McConnell has been a loyal foot soldier to the gun lobby, reliably shutting down any attempt to push common-sense gun safety laws through the Senate, even as nearly 40,000 Americans are killed by gun violence every year.

But with the 2020 election just weeks away, both McConnell and the NRA are teetering on the precipice of a steep political fall. FiveThirtyEight now gives Democrats the edge when it comes to winning the Senate. And the future looks even bleaker for the NRA, which is imploding before our eyes. The once-mighty lobbying group is now under investigation by multiple authorities, riven by infighting that makes the 1977 coup look like a game of Uno, and slowly losing support among Republicans politicians. But even as it becomes increasingly clear that both McConnell and the NRA are in serious trouble, the Majority Leader is trying to jam through one last gift to the gun lobby: Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee.

To put it simply, Judge Barrett would be a dream Supreme Court Justice for the NRA — and a nightmare when it comes to the safety of the American people. Just last year, she wrote an alarming opinion opposing laws to keep guns away from people convicted of serious crimes. In Kanter v. Barr, a man who committed fraud argued that laws prohibiting people convicted of felonies from possessing firearms should not apply to him. Two other Republican-appointed judges rejected his argument, noting that laws to disarm felons are “substantially related to the important government objective of keeping firearms away from those convicted of serious crimes.” But Judge Barrett argued that categorically barring non-violent felons from possessing guns violates the Second Amendment — an approach that no federal court of appeals has adopted. She went on to criticize her fellow judges as treating “the Second Amendment as a

Sen. Joni Ernst: Judge Amy Coney Barrett is a role model for girls and shows US women have great freedoms

We are wrapping up a historic event in our nation: the Senate confirmation hearing for 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Amy Coney Barrett for a seat on the Supreme Court. If confirmed, Judge Barrett would be the first mother of school-age children to serve on the high court.

As any mom can attest, balancing schoolwork, dinner and bath time with emails, conference calls and job duties is harder than ever. And with seven children, Judge Barrett’s willingness to jump into serving on the Supreme Court is a real boost to #mompower.

To get here, Judge Barrett has had to endure a grueling degree of scrutiny from lawmakers and the media. Folks have undermined her as a person, attacked her family and children, and challenged her religious beliefs.

ABA, BARRETT ALLIES LAUD NOMINEE AS ‘BRILLIANT’ AS DEMOCRAT WITNESSES WARN OF ‘REAL-WORLD HARM’ IF CONFIRMED

Her political opponents have tried to paint Judge Barret’s nomination as some sort of dystopian fulfillment of “The Handmaid’s Tale,” falsely portraying her as a domestic maidservant to her dominating husband.

Of course, this narrative is ridiculous and cartoonish. It is a full fireworks display of the hatred

Hollywood types and their coastal elite friends have toward people of faith, the heartland and conservative women. 

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The irony of these attacks is just how demeaning to women they really are — implying that Judge Barrett, a working mother of seven with a strong record of professional and academic accomplishment, isn’t capable of a seat on the highest court of the land.

Anyone who watched the Judiciary Committee hearing this week knows that Judge Barrett ran circles around 10 Democratic senators. She invoked complex legal analyses and thoughtful rationales about her judicial philosophy, as well as a sense of service and duty to her nation.

While explaining how she and her family made the life-changing decision to accept President Trump’s nomination to the Supreme Court, Judge Barrett posed a question that has stuck with me: “Why should I say someone else should do the difficulty? If the difficulty is the only reason to say no, then I should serve my country.”

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Moms deal with difficult problems all the time. And we just make it work. After spending time getting to know Judge Barrett as a mother, jurist and professor, it is not at all a surprise to hear of her deep sense of duty and acceptance of the difficulty.

 This sense of duty and a broader purpose is something I can relate to, having served my country in the Army Reserve and Iowa Army National Guard. And it’s something Americans from all walks of life — from veterans and service members, to moms and dads, doctors and nurses, teachers and law enforcement officers — can relate to.

 Amy Coney Barrett is a role model for young girls and an example of the great freedoms American women have to be who they want to be.

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