Crowds gather for Women’s March to protest Trump and Supreme Court nominee

Demonstrators wore pink knit pussyhats and black face masks honoring the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Saturday for the second Women’s March of the year.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: With the U.S Capitol in the back ground, demonstrators march on Pennsylvania Avenue during the Women's March in Washington, Saturday, Oct. 17, 2020. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)


© Jose Luis Magana/AP
With the U.S Capitol in the back ground, demonstrators march on Pennsylvania Avenue during the Women’s March in Washington, Saturday, Oct. 17, 2020. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Women and allies gathered in Washington, DC, and several other cities around the country to protest President Donald Trump’s nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court and urge women to vote in the upcoming election.

“I want my country back,” Barbara Moore of Arlington told CNN affiliate WJLA.

The crowd marched from Freedom Plaza to the National Mall, some carrying signs with messages like “Hell no, Amy must go!” and “You call us nasty because you are afraid of what strong women can do.”

Karen Ehrgott said she traveled from the Philadelphia area to attend the march to protest Barrett’s nomination and the push to confirm her before the November 3 election.

“It’s a mess. It’s really, really a mess. I am very, very fearful of our democracy,” Ehrgott told CNN. “I thought it was thriving and nothing could ever happen, but clearly it’s a lot more fragile than we understood it to be.”

Trump has pointed to the November 3 election as a reason for seeking swift Senate confirmation of Barrett, a federal appeals court judge who would be his third appointee to the nine-member bench. The President has said he believes the Supreme Court could ultimately decide whether he or his Democratic opponent, former Vice President Joe Biden, is the winner of the election.

Saturday’s event is the second Women’s March this year. Partially due to the pandemic, the crowd was much smaller than the January 18 event and even more than the first-ever Women’s March in 2017, which may have been the largest single-day protest in US history.

Simultaneous marches were held in other cities including Denver, New York and Nashville.

The Women’s March organization has suffered from growing pains since its first show of force in 2017.

Controversy and allegations of anti-Semitism surrounding its founders eventually led to three of them stepping down from the board last year. They had denied the allegations. The Women’s March then appointed 17 new leaders to the board.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Dozens of Women's March rallies were planned across the country, including one in Nashville, Tennessee.


© Mark Humphrey/AP
Dozens of Women’s March rallies were planned across the country, including one in Nashville, Tennessee.



a group of people jumping in the air: Participants in the Womens March are met by demonstrators in support of Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett outside the US Supreme Court.


© Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images
Participants in the Womens March are met by demonstrators in support of Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett outside the US Supreme Court.

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Thousands Protest Trump’s Supreme Court Pick at Washington Women’s March | Top News

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Thousands marched to the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington on Saturday to commemorate the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and protest President Donald Trump’s rush to push through Amy Coney Barrett as her replacement.

The U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee has scheduled an Oct. 22 vote on the nomination of Barrett, a conservative appellate judge, over objections from Democrats that the confirmation process comes too close to the Nov. 3 presidential election.

More than 26 million Americans have already cast their ballots for who they want to sit in the White House for the next four years, Trump or his Democratic rival Joe Biden.

Demonstrators at the Women’s March said they were angry that Republicans appear ready to confirm Barrett’s nomination so close to Election Day after refusing to move forward Merrick Garland, the pick of former President Barack Obama, a Democrat, more than six months ahead of the 2016 election.

“The fact of the matter is that we are powerful and they are afraid,” said Sonja Spoo, the director of the reproductive rights campaigns at UltraViolet, a feminist advocacy group, one of the speakers at the protest. “They are on the ropes and they know it and we are about to give the knock-out punch.”

Ginsburg, a liberal champion of women’s rights, died on Sept. 18.

Prudence Sullivan, 49, from Lake in the Hills, Illinois, near Chicago, and her sister Kelli Padgett, 47, from Jacksonville, Florida, flew in to join what they described as an energizing and empowering event.

“We’ve had losses from COVID and we’ve clashed with family members over racism, Black Lives Matter,” Sullivan said. “So this is something where I can put my money where my mouth is.”

Sullivan said she and her husband, an IT expert, were looking at options for moving overseas if Trump was reelected.

The protesters marched through downtown Washington to the Supreme Court steps. Hundreds of marches and demonstrations were planned https://map.womensmarch.com/?eventType=oct-17-march at city halls, parks and monuments across the country.

In confirmation hearings this week, Barrett side-stepped https://www.reuters.com/article/usa-court-barrett-climate/environmentalists-democrats-fault-trump-court-pick-barrett-on-climate-evasion-idINKBN2702L3 questions about presidential powers, abortion, climate change, voting rights and Obamacare, saying she could not answer because cases involving these matters could come before the court.

If Barrett takes a seat on the Supreme Court, conservatives would have a 6-3 majority.

(Reporting by Timothy Gardner; Addditional reporting by Andrea Shalal; Editing by Heather Timmons, Sonya Hepinstall and Daniel Wallis)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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Women’s March: Thousands in D.C. expected to march to Supreme Court

“Everything we’ve been doing has been leading up to this,” said Caitlin Breedlove, deputy executive director of organizational advancement for the Women’s March. “We’re not only in resistance. We’re actually fighting for what we need to build.”

The march will take place days before Senate Republicans hold their first vote to confirm Barrett to replace liberal leader and feminist icon Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Barrett’s nomination is expected to be approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee, which is scheduled to vote on Thursday

At 11 a.m., an estimated 6,000 to 10,000 people are expected to gather on Freedom Plaza ahead of a noon rally urging women to vote and calling on Congress to suspend the Supreme Court confirmation process, according to a permit issued by the National Park Service on Wednesday. After the rally, participants plan to march southeast along Pennsylvania Avenue NW and then Constitution Avenue NW to the Supreme Court.

They will wrap around the U.S. Capitol and end the march on the Mall, where a smaller group of demonstrators will take part in a text-a-thon event to urge women across the country to vote. Thousands of Women’s March volunteers have already texted more than 4 million women voters and aim to send 5 million texts in a single day on Saturday, according to the group.

At the same time, a counterprotest organized by a conservative women’s organization will also take place at the Supreme Court. An “I’m With Her” rally in support of Barrett and organized by the Independent Women’s Forum is scheduled for 1 p.m. to send the message that the Women’s March participants “do not speak for all women.” The counterprotest is expected to be smaller than the Women’s March.

Several D.C. streets will prohibit parking, while others will close Saturday for the events, which start at 11 a.m. and are expected to end at about 5 p.m.

Each year since pink-hatted women first flooded the nation’s capital the day after President Trump’s inauguration in 2017, the Women’s March has organized marches in January nationwide, promoting a list of policy demands and helping motivate women to run for office in record numbers. But the marches in recent years have drawn much smaller crowds than the first historic showing. The national organization has at times struggled to remain relevant, as scores of its initial attendees have redirected their attention toward other causes.

At the most recent Women’s March in January, some attendees said they hoped they wouldn’t need to march again, following the 2020 election.

But last month, “the death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg reset the whole country,” said Rachel O’Leary Carmona, executive director of the Women’s March.

The group’s organizers quickly planned hundreds of marches, both virtual and in-person, focused primarily on voting rights and the Supreme Court confirmation process.

“We didn’t want to drain any energy from the election process,” Breedlove said. “We actually wanted to help harness the power of the women we work with.”

The march comes amid an economic recession that has

Womens March returns to protest Trump and Amy Coney Barrett’s Supreme Court nomination

In Washington, D.C., organizers expect between 6,000 and 10,000 people to gather on Freedom Plaza for a midday rally focused on voting rights and calling on Congress to suspend the Supreme Court confirmation process, according to a permit issued by the National Park Service on Wednesday. After the rally, participants will march to the U.S. Supreme Court and the U.S. Capitol.

“Women are going to decide this election,” said Rachel O’Leary Carmona, executive director of the Women’s March. “We are fired up. We are ready to take action. This is a preview of what you’re going to see on November 3rd.”

The march will take place days before Senate Republicans hold their first vote to confirm Barrett to replace liberal leader and feminist icon Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Her nomination is expected to be approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee, which is scheduled to vote on Oct. 22. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) told reporters that the full Senate will begin debate on the nominee on Oct. 23.

Saturday’s Women’s March in D.C. is expected to be one of at least 415 marches and events taking place in person and virtually in cities across the country, O’Leary Carmona said. That’s significantly fewer marches than the first Women’s March in 2017, when millions of people flooded the streets in about 700 marches across the country in a historic demonstration protesting Trump’s inauguration.

But O’Leary Carmona said organizers aim to reach the same number of marches as they did in 2018, when about 500 events were planned nationwide. Among the events planned for Saturday are golf-cart processions, car caravans and a march that will begin at Ginsburg’s college dorm at Cornell University.

Unlike during past years’ marches in the nation’s capital, Women’s March leaders are hoping for a relatively smaller crowd in the District because of social distancing concerns. They are discouraging participants from traveling to D.C. from states that are on the self-quarantine list and are not involved in organizing any buses from other cities. Instead, they encourage supporters to attend local marches or to get involved with its “text-a-thon” efforts, O’Leary Carmona said.

About 2,800 people have indicated on Facebook that they will attend the march in Washington, and more than 11,700 have said they are interested. LED screens will be placed around the area to encourage mask-wearing and social distancing, according to the group’s permit.

Saturday’s rally in Freedom Plaza will feature speakers from the Women’s March organization, the National Women’s Law Center, Planned Parenthood, Black Lives Matter D.C., and a number of other left-leaning feminist organizations. But it will only last about 35 minutes, unlike some of the long rallies of the first few Women’s March events, O’Leary Carmona said. “This is all about the marchers,” she said.

After the rally and march to the Supreme Court, a smaller crowd of about 1,000 people will continue on and march to the Mall for a text-a-thon event to urge women across the country to vote, according to the group’s