Creepy deepfake bot created fake nudes by ‘undressing’ images of more than 100,000 women: research

A deepfake bot has used artificial intelligence to “undress” images of women on the messaging app Telegram, according to new research.

Security specialist Sensity announced the research Tuesday, noting that the bot lets users “photo-realistically ‘strip naked’ images of women.”

Deepfakes use artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning to create false, but realistic-looking clips.

TERRIFYING HIGH-TECH PORN: CREEPY ‘DEEPFAKE’ VIDEOS ARE ON THE RISE

Deepfakes have become a the focal point of those who fight online misinformation. (Photo by Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images)

Deepfakes have become a the focal point of those who fight online misinformation. (Photo by Thomas Trutschel/Photothek via Getty Images)

“Today we go public with the findings of a new investigation,” Sensity tweeted. “Early this year we uncovered a new deepfake bot on Telegram, an evolution of the infamous DeepNude from 2019, which ‘undressed’ at least 100.000 women without their knowledge.”

The researchers explained that to “strip” an image, users upload a photo of the targeted person to the bot. They then receive the processed image after what is described as a short generation process.

Sensity said that at least 104,852 women have been targeted and had their personal “stripped” images shared publicly as of the end of July 2020. “The number of these images grew by 198% in the last 3 months until July,” explained Sensity, in a statement.

CREEPY APOLLO 11 NIXON DEEPFAKE VIDEO CREATED BY MIT TO SHOW DANGERS OF HIGH-TECH MISINFORMATION

Some 70% of the targets are private individuals whose photos were taken from social media accounts or private material, according to the researchers. Some of the targets appeared to be underage, Sensity added.

Fox News has reached out to Telegram with a request for comment on this story.

Doctored videos have been in the spotlight recent years. In 2019, for example, video clips of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif, were manipulated to falsely depict her as drunk, sparking outrage.

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Scientists at MIT have also highlighted the dangers that deepfakes pose by digitally manipulating video and audio to create a creepy deepfake of President Nixon “delivering” a speech that would have been used in the event of an Apollo 11 disaster.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

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Ramona artist’s Halloween jewelry can be whimsical or downright creepy

Like many artists, Ramona resident Katie Tamura believes “art should make you feel something.”

Unlike many artists, Tamura likes to create pieces that make people feel uncomfortable.

Tamura’s art typically features her handmade jewelry. And with Halloween just around the corner, the shape, construction and subjects of her Creepy Katie’s Curiosities pieces often either delight — or terrify— her fans.

Many of her pieces feature ghosts, witch hats, cauldrons, potion bottles, voodoo dolls, skulls, crescent moons, creepy crawlies and “things that make people freak.”

“My specialty is full-scale metal fabrication, soldering. I do all of the work myself,” she says.

Her pieces often combine metals, such as silver, copper and brass. She’s unafraid of mixing antique and vintage bits and bobs into her jewelry, and even makes her own chains for her necklaces.

The spider the web and even the chain were all handmade by Katie Tamura.

The spider the web and even the chain were all handmade by Katie Tamura.

(Courtesy )

“Everything is one of a kind,” she says. “I don’t mass produce anything. I like keeping things unique.”

Tamura gets her inspiration from books, horror movies, classic witchcraft, the occult and “all the weird, cute, spooky stuff,” she says. She sells her items online, through both her website and Facebook.

The combination of her subjects and the items she uses to make them causes some people to get “acutely uneasy,” she says. “I use real bones, teeth, bug parts such as scarab wings, even shed snake skin. I even turned my boyfriend’s wisdom teeth into earrings.”

Tamura deals with the reactions matter-of-factly.

“Some people get weirded out and some get grossed out,” she says.

Not all of her items are scary; she says she does some “Harry Potter fandom”-type pieces, and others “just for fun.”

For example, Tamura has been designing a lot of pieces with eyes lately. Not flat, obviously fake eyeballs, but vintage and unusual orbs, such as a necklace featuring an antique glass albino deer eye.

Katie Tamura made the setting for this eye piece, which is either looking right at you—or right through you.

Katie Tamura made the setting for this eye piece, which is either looking right at you—or right through you.

(Courtesy )

Describing the piece, she says, the eye is “lovingly wreathed in a custom filigree brass spiderweb bezel, weeping bloody vintage crystal tears and crowned with a faceted onyx glass and silver dangle.”

Another item — a ring she created — features an antique glass doll eye set in a silver rope. The piece is not only “eye catching,” but unsettling and fascinating all at the same time.

She credits her parents, Stanley and Julie Tamura, for her artistic sensibilities.

“My whole family is artsy,” she says. “I grew up around it. My mom does stained glass and fiber arts. My dad is a blacksmith, and makes swords and knives.”

Aside from her interest in jewelry, she creates miniature weapons, such as meat cleavers and knives — skills she learned from her dad.

“He started teaching me how to do all this stuff with torches and saws when I was just 10 years old. I’ve been doing it now more than 20