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Herndon Women’s March Focuses On Equity, Voting

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See the Most Moving Images on Social Media from Saturday’s Women’s March

Photo credit: Mario Tama - Getty Images
Photo credit: Mario Tama – Getty Images

From ELLE

On Saturday, the fifth Women’s March took place in D.C. and in hundreds of cities across the U.S.

“We’re holding socially distant actions across the country to send an unmistakable message about the fierce opposition to Trump and his agenda, including his attempt to fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat,” the Women’s March website read ahead of the October 17 march.

The day also seemed to be a chance for marchers to pay tribute to the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died on September 19. Marchers went past the Supreme Court building, some wearing face masks featuring RBG-inspired lace collars. One large sign displayed over the D.C. March read, “March to honor her seat.”

Many protesters shared their feelings about the confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett and what it could mean for Roe v. Wade. Following the Senate hearings for Barrett’s confirmation, many reproductive rights activists have expressed concern over Barrett’s response when questioned about Roe.

“She will undermine our access to reproductive health care, to abortion from voting rights to climate change,” Goss Groves, of the National Women’s Law Center, told crowds in D.C. “She refused to even answer basic questions.”

Although Barrett’s nomination might highlight the fight for Roe in this country, protecting reproductive freedoms has been the underlying message at the Women’s Marches since the first organized even in 2017.

“Our rights are not up for debate, the Center for Reproductive Rights, a sponsor of the march, wrote in a press release then. “We will refuse to go backwards on access to reproductive health care for all women. The Women’s March happening in D.C. and across the U.S. marks the beginning of an unprecedented wave of action and civic participation that will not relent until our rights re respected.”

Here are some of the best social images from yesterday’s national marches.

Lots of tributes to RBG

Someone took the time to bring RBG a gift at her gravesite:

This brother-and-sister pair put together this shout-out to RBG and John Lewis:

Handmaids Tale costumes

Here are some more general scenes from the day, ICYMI

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Kalamazoo women’s march honors Ginsburg’s legacy, encourages voters to head to polls

KALAMAZOO — More than a thousand people braved the chilly temperatures Saturday morning at Bronson Park for the Kalamazoo women’s rally and march in honor of late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.



a group of people walking down the street: Protesters march down South Park Street in downtown Kalamazoo, carrying signs and flags as part of the Kalamazoo women's march on Saturday, Oct. 17.


© Samuel J. Robinson | srobinson@mlive.com/mlive.com/TNS
Protesters march down South Park Street in downtown Kalamazoo, carrying signs and flags as part of the Kalamazoo women’s march on Saturday, Oct. 17.

The second demonstration of its kind in Kalamazoo since January, Saturday’s event coincided with marches held nationwide to celebrate the life and legacy of Ginsburg, ramp up voter enthusiasm and oppose the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court.

Related: Women’s march in Ann Arbor encourages people to vote, empower women

More than 1,100 people gathered in Bronson Park, according to organizers. Some people brought signs, flags, facemasks and mementos that gave a nod to Ginsburg, who passed away on Sept. 18.

The event was emceed by Kalamazoo County Commissioner Stephanie Moore, who brought Kalamazoo’s DJ Chuck to provide live music and entertainment throughout the afternoon.



a group of people standing in front of a sign: People walk down Michigan Avenue in downtown Kalamazoo as part of the Kalamazoo women's march on Saturday, Oct. 17.


© Samuel J. Robinson | srobinson@mlive.com/mlive.com/TNS
People walk down Michigan Avenue in downtown Kalamazoo as part of the Kalamazoo women’s march on Saturday, Oct. 17.

Organizers said the death of Ginsburg, a leading litigator of women’s rights and an icon to advocates, and the subsequent nomination by President Trump to replace Ginsburg’s seat with Barrett, was the catalyst for Saturday’s event.

Democrats and Republicans on Capitol Hill have debated whether or not the president should make a nomination so close to an election. A similar debate happened in 2016 when the Republican-led Senate blocked then-President Barack Obama’s nomination.

Joe “Annie” Morgan, the organizer behind Kalamazoo’s march Saturday said Republicans in the US Senate should let the people have a say in who they want to replace Ginsburg in the Supreme Court.

“The GOP trying to nominate Amy Barrett three weeks before an election, I mean c’mon— you want to talk about packing the court, that’s exactly what Republicans are doing,” Morgan said.

Morgan and others who took the stage stressed the march meant more than just a vocal opposition to Barrett’s confirmation to the US Supreme Court, which the Senate Judiciary Committee is expected to vote on Oct. 22, but an opposition of everyone who they say is working against civil rights, the rights of women, and members of the LGBTQ+ communities.



a person holding a sign: Marchers begin walking down South Park Street carrying the women's march sign.


© Samuel J. Robinson | srobinson@mlive.com/mlive.com/TNS
Marchers begin walking down South Park Street carrying the women’s march sign.

“The most important thing we can do is vote,” said Diane Melvin, director of religious education at People’s Church in Kalamazoo. “It is time for us to rise up together for equity and justice — the time is right for change. We need to envision the type of world we want to live in, a community that regards all people regardless of gender, their gender identity, who they love or the color of their skin,” Melvin said.



a person holding a sign: Dozens of people came to Bronson Park carrying signs and flags in honor of late Justice Ginsburg.


© Samuel J. Robinson | srobinson@mlive.com/mlive.com/TNS
Dozens of people came

Baltimore Women’s March pushes message of ‘dissent’ ahead of presidential election

In the final days of a historic election season, young women linked arms Saturday with their mothers and matriarchs for the 2020 Women’s March through downtown Baltimore.



a couple of people that are standing in front of a sign: Kori Christian, left, and Arrion carry a sign together outside of City Hall. The 2020 Baltimore Women's March began outside of the U.S. District Courthouse and moved through downtown to City Hall. 10-17-2020


© Ulysses Muu00f1oz/The Baltimore Sun/The Baltimore Sun/TNS
Kori Christian, left, and Arrion carry a sign together outside of City Hall. The 2020 Baltimore Women’s March began outside of the U.S. District Courthouse and moved through downtown to City Hall. 10-17-2020

About 200 people gathered outside the federal courthouse in the 100 block of W. Lombard St. for the event, which has been held annually for about three years. Conceived during the presidency of Republican Donald J. Trump, the progressive grassroots movement has transitioned its battle cry of “resist” in 2017 to “dissent” in 2020 — emphasizing the role of women voters in the Nov. 3 election.



a group of people holding a sign posing for the camera: Morgan Stankiewicz and Karla Rivas hold signs and listen to the speakers outside of City Hall. The 2020 Baltimore Women's March began outside of the U.S. District Courthouse and moved through downtown to City Hall. 10-17-2020


© Ulysses Muu00f1oz/The Baltimore Sun/The Baltimore Sun/TNS
Morgan Stankiewicz and Karla Rivas hold signs and listen to the speakers outside of City Hall. The 2020 Baltimore Women’s March began outside of the U.S. District Courthouse and moved through downtown to City Hall. 10-17-2020

Organizers of the Baltimore event included representatives of Baltimore Women United, NARAL Pro-Choice Maryland and Planned Parenthood.

Women United co-chair Odette Ramos said organizers had three messages for the community Saturday: make a plan to vote, tell U.S. senators to delay any confirmations to the U.S. Supreme Court until after the January presidential inauguration, and volunteer to place phone calls to swing states leading up to the general election.



a man holding a microphone: Giuliana Valencia-Banks, of Baltimore Women United, speaks to the crowd outside of City Hall. The 2020 Baltimore Women's March began outside of the U.S. District Courthouse and moved through downtown to City Hall. 10-17-2020


© Ulysses Muu00f1oz/The Baltimore Sun/The Baltimore Sun/TNS
Giuliana Valencia-Banks, of Baltimore Women United, speaks to the crowd outside of City Hall. The 2020 Baltimore Women’s March began outside of the U.S. District Courthouse and moved through downtown to City Hall. 10-17-2020

Other women’s marches were held Saturday in dozens of U.S. cities, including Washington, New York and San Francisco.

The Baltimore event attracted dozens of women spanning multiple generations, some of who said they marched for their mothers or daughters. Some wore pink, knit hats and held homemade signs stating “Make America better” and “Not voting is not a protest, it’s surrender.”

Ramos wore a black mask with a white fringe — an homage to the signature lace collars worn by the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg — that she said her mother made for her.

Young women, in particular, represented a significant portion of those in attendance.

Elizabeth Polydefkis spent her 18th birthday Saturday marching alongside her mom to City Hall. The act of protest was “empowering,” she said.

“I’m scared for our democracy with Trump,” Polydefkis said. “Women have worked really hard for their rights. I’ve seen a lot of that work eroded in the past four years.”



a person sitting on a bench reading a book: A woman with a sign sits and listens to the speakers. The 2020 Baltimore Women's March began outside of the U.S. District Courthouse and moved through downtown to City Hall. 10-17-2020


© Ulysses Muu00f1oz/The Baltimore Sun/The Baltimore Sun/TNS
A woman with a sign sits and listens to the speakers. The 2020 Baltimore Women’s March began outside of the U.S. District Courthouse and moved through downtown to City Hall. 10-17-2020

As the trail of activists wound through downtown, drivers honked horns in support. One

Washington flooded with Women’s March protesters ahead of Barrett confirmation vote

Women’s March protestors flooded the streets in Washington, D.C., on Saturday to demonstrate against the Trump administration and its decision to appoint Judge Amy Coney BarrettAmy Coney BarrettRepublicans increasingly seek distance from Trump Overnight Health Care: Pfizer could apply for vaccine authorization by late November | State health officials say they need .4B for vaccination effort | CDC: Blacks, Hispanics dying of COVID-19 at disproportionately high rates Major abortion rights group calls for Democrats to replace Feinstein on Judiciary Committee MORE to the Supreme Court. 

Saturday’s march is a separate series of localized protests organized by the Women’s March, which gathered this year in January. The annual demonstration began in Washington and around the country following Trump’s inauguration in 2017. 

Around 11 a.m. local time Saturday, several hundred people assembled at Freedom Plaza before a noon rally. Rallygoers in Washington, D.C., were required to wear a mask or face covering and practice social distancing amid the pandemic. In addition several events to commemorate the demonstrations were also held virtually. 

Speakers and participants at the rally urged women to vote and call members of Congress to suspend the Supreme Court confirmation process, the Washington Post reported. 

Protesters gathered throughout the day in the nation’s capitol bringing signs and costumes.

A group of approximately a dozen women dressed in red dresses and white bonnets attended the protest. Their garb mirrors Margaret Atwood’s dystopian classic “The Handmaid’s Tale” and the women protested with signs hanging from their necks with the words “Trump Pence OUT NOW!”

Washington Post reporter Rebecca Tan shared photos of two smaller rallygoers, 7-year-old twins Harriet and Myles, who attended the march in Washington, D.C., dressed as the late Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgDemocrats see cash floodgates open ahead of Election Day The 2016 and 2020 Senate votes are about the same thing: constitutionalist judges Supreme Court battle turns into 2020 proxy war MORE and longtime Rep. John LewisJohn LewisHBCU in Alabama renames hall named after KKK leader Cedric Richmond’s next move: ‘Sky’s the limit’ if Biden wins Amy Coney Barrett hearing reveals Senate’s misplaced priorities MORE (D-Ga.). 

 

Ginsburg died last month after a battle with pancreatic cancer. Following her death, Trump announced that he would move to fill the seat vacated by the liberal justice on the Supreme Court. The decision has outraged Democrats who argue that the next justice should be chosen by whoever wins the Nov. 3 election. 

Barrett, Trump’s nominee, would give the court a 6-3 conservative super majority. Democrats worry that with Barrett’s appointment, Republicans will be able to overturn Roe v. Wade, a decision that has become a focal point during this election cycle. 

A smaller rally of conservative women’s

Women’s March demonstrators take over Boston streets chanting ‘Vote Him Out’

Chanting “My Body My Choice,” and “Vote Him Out,” roughly 1,000 demonstrators took over the streets around Boston Common in a show of resistance to President Trump, one of more than 400 such events staged in all 50 states on Saturday.

The demonstrations were planned by the Women’s March organization that staged marches around the world the day after Trump’s inauguration to protest the confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett and to rally voter opposition to Trump’s reelection.

“We’re not going to allow the Trump administration to decide who has equal rights and who doesn’t,” Siobhan Reidy, the lead organizer of the event, told demonstrators gathered across the street from the State House before the march. “We are here today to tell the temporary occupant of the White House that his sham of a nomination process is not supported by the American people.”

Starr Felder was in the crowd at a women's rally on Boston Common.
Starr Felder was in the crowd at a women’s rally on Boston Common.Jonathan Wiggs/Globe Staff

Reidy pointed to liberal concerns that, with the addition of Barrett, a more conservative Supreme Court may overturn the rulings that legalized abortion and same-sex marriage, and may not uphold the Affordable Care Act instituted by President Obama.

“We are here to tell Amy Coney Barrett that Roe v. Wade, Obergefell v. Hodges and the ACA are settled law, and she will not take that away from us,” Reidy said.

“Tell them that we refuse to be handmaids,” she added.

Toiell Washington, of Black Boston, led the crowd in a call-and-response chant saying, “I will protect Black women. I will support women. I will believe Black women.”

And speaker Rosario Ubiera-Minaya used a cheeky reminder of the president’s preelection comments about women captured by Access Hollywood when she urged demonstrators from the Boston Common steps: “Let’s amplify our voices. Let’s grab him by the ballot.”

With polls indicating a gaping gender divide in the Nov. 3 election between Trump and Democratic nominee, former Vice President Joe Biden, women’s votes will be key to defeating Trump, Rachel O’Leary Carmona, Women’s March executive director, said in an interview. One recent poll found Biden’s lead over Trump to be 59 percent to 36 percent among women, the widest margin for a presidential candidate in exit polls since 1976.

“They’re about to learn what happens when you subvert the will of the people, when you come for women and when you come for democracy itself,” said O’Leary Carmona.

O’Leary Carmona called Trump’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic “mind-blowingly incompetent.”

“By any kind of measure, we are sicker, we are poorer, we are unhappier than we were four years ago,” O’Leary Carmona said. “Oftentimes we talk about, are we thriving or are we surviving? I would say we’re not even surviving at this point.”

A person with their sign at a women's rally on Boston Common.
A person with their sign at a women’s rally on Boston Common.Jonathan Wiggs/Globe Staff

State Representative Lindsay Sabadosa, who decided to run for office after organizing the women’s march in Northampton in 2017, told participants at the march that

4th annual Women’s March draws protesters across the country

Thousands of protesters took part in women’s marches on Saturday, with a main event in Washington, D.C., and sister marches taking place across the country.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: With the U.S Capitol in the background, demonstrators march on Pennsylvania Av. during the Women's March in Washington, Oct. 17, 2020.


© Jose Luis Magana/AP
With the U.S Capitol in the background, demonstrators march on Pennsylvania Av. during the Women’s March in Washington, Oct. 17, 2020.

Organizers had anticipated 116,000 in-person and virtual participants. They said tens of thousands showed up at what turned out to be 438 #CountonUs marches across all 50 states.

Actions were planned in key swing states including “a march for Black lives lost in Milwaukee, Wisconsin,” a “Feminist Icon Costume Party in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania,” and a “golf cart parade at The Villages, Florida,” according to organizers.

Women’s march protests have taken place every year since the first drew more than a million to various locations the day after the inauguration of President Donald Trump.

This year’s goal was to ensure that the 1.25 million women on the organization’s list vote and bring three friends.

“Women showed up in force on day 1 of Trump’s presidency for the first Women’s March, and now we’re mobilizing to finish what we started,” Rachel O’Leary Carmona, the executive director of Women’s March said in a statement. “Trump’s presidency began with women taking to the streets, and that’s how it’s going to end.”

MORE: Women’s March 2019: Everything you need to know


a group of people walking in front of a crowd: With the U.S Capitol in the background, demonstrators march on Pennsylvania Av. during the Women's March in Washington, Oct. 17, 2020.


© Jose Luis Magana/AP
With the U.S Capitol in the background, demonstrators march on Pennsylvania Av. during the Women’s March in Washington, Oct. 17, 2020.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: People take part in the 2020 Women's March next to the New York Stock Exchange in New York City, Oct. 17, 2020.


© Eduardo Munoz/Reuters
People take part in the 2020 Women’s March next to the New York Stock Exchange in New York City, Oct. 17, 2020.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: People march during the Women's March in downtown Chicago, Oct. 17, 2020.


© Nam Y. Huh/AP
People march during the Women’s March in downtown Chicago, Oct. 17, 2020.



a group of people holding a sign: People take part in a Power Together Women's March, Oct. 17, 2020, in Nashville, Tenn.


© Mark Humphrey/AP
People take part in a Power Together Women’s March, Oct. 17, 2020, in Nashville, Tenn.



a group of people posing for the camera: Dressed as handmaids, protesters attend the Women's March at Freedom Plaza on Oct. 17, 2020, in Washington.


© Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images
Dressed as handmaids, protesters attend the Women’s March at Freedom Plaza on Oct. 17, 2020, in Washington.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Demonstrators rally during the Women's March at Freedom Plaza, Oct. 17, 2020, in Washington.


© Jose Luis Magana/AP
Demonstrators rally during the Women’s March at Freedom Plaza, Oct. 17, 2020, in Washington.



a man and a woman looking at the camera: A woman wears a face mask with images of late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as people take part in the 2020 Women's March at Washington Square park in New York City, Oct. 17, 2020.


© Eduardo Munoz/Reuters
A woman wears a face mask with images of late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as people take part in the 2020 Women’s March at Washington Square park in New York City, Oct. 17, 2020.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: People participate in a nationwide Women's March in honor of the late late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before the 2020 election, in Washington, Oct. 17, 2020.


© Erin Scott/Reuters
People participate in a nationwide Women’s March in honor of the late late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before the 2020 election, in Washington, Oct. 17, 2020.



a person holding a sign posing for the camera: People rally during the Women's March at Freedom Plaza, Oct. 17, 2020, in Washington.


© Jose Luis Magana/AP
People rally during the Women’s March at Freedom Plaza, Oct. 17, 2020, in Washington.



a group of people walking in front of a crowd: Demonstrators gather to take part in the nationwide Women's March on Oct. 17, 2020, at Freedom Plaza in Washington.


© Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images
Demonstrators gather to take part in the nationwide Women’s March on Oct. 17, 2020, at Freedom Plaza in Washington.



a man holding a sign: People gather for the Women's March in Freedom Plaza, in Washington, Oct. 17, 2020.


© GAMAL DIAB/EPA via Shutterstock
People gather for the Women’s March in Freedom Plaza, in Washington, Oct. 17, 2020.

Video: Protesters gather at Freedom Plaza for Washington’s women’s march (AFP)

Protesters gather at Freedom Plaza for Washington’s women’s march

Crowds gather for Women’s March to protest Trump and Supreme Court nominee

Demonstrators wore pink knit pussyhats and black face masks honoring the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Saturday for the second Women’s March of the year.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: With the U.S Capitol in the back ground, demonstrators march on Pennsylvania Avenue during the Women's March in Washington, Saturday, Oct. 17, 2020. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)


© Jose Luis Magana/AP
With the U.S Capitol in the back ground, demonstrators march on Pennsylvania Avenue during the Women’s March in Washington, Saturday, Oct. 17, 2020. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Women and allies gathered in Washington, DC, and several other cities around the country to protest President Donald Trump’s nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court and urge women to vote in the upcoming election.

“I want my country back,” Barbara Moore of Arlington told CNN affiliate WJLA.

The crowd marched from Freedom Plaza to the National Mall, some carrying signs with messages like “Hell no, Amy must go!” and “You call us nasty because you are afraid of what strong women can do.”

Karen Ehrgott said she traveled from the Philadelphia area to attend the march to protest Barrett’s nomination and the push to confirm her before the November 3 election.

“It’s a mess. It’s really, really a mess. I am very, very fearful of our democracy,” Ehrgott told CNN. “I thought it was thriving and nothing could ever happen, but clearly it’s a lot more fragile than we understood it to be.”

Trump has pointed to the November 3 election as a reason for seeking swift Senate confirmation of Barrett, a federal appeals court judge who would be his third appointee to the nine-member bench. The President has said he believes the Supreme Court could ultimately decide whether he or his Democratic opponent, former Vice President Joe Biden, is the winner of the election.

Saturday’s event is the second Women’s March this year. Partially due to the pandemic, the crowd was much smaller than the January 18 event and even more than the first-ever Women’s March in 2017, which may have been the largest single-day protest in US history.

Simultaneous marches were held in other cities including Denver, New York and Nashville.

The Women’s March organization has suffered from growing pains since its first show of force in 2017.

Controversy and allegations of anti-Semitism surrounding its founders eventually led to three of them stepping down from the board last year. They had denied the allegations. The Women’s March then appointed 17 new leaders to the board.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Dozens of Women's March rallies were planned across the country, including one in Nashville, Tennessee.


© Mark Humphrey/AP
Dozens of Women’s March rallies were planned across the country, including one in Nashville, Tennessee.



a group of people jumping in the air: Participants in the Womens March are met by demonstrators in support of Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett outside the US Supreme Court.


© Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images
Participants in the Womens March are met by demonstrators in support of Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett outside the US Supreme Court.

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Thousands Protest Trump’s Supreme Court Pick at Washington Women’s March | Top News

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Thousands marched to the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington on Saturday to commemorate the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and protest President Donald Trump’s rush to push through Amy Coney Barrett as her replacement.

The U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee has scheduled an Oct. 22 vote on the nomination of Barrett, a conservative appellate judge, over objections from Democrats that the confirmation process comes too close to the Nov. 3 presidential election.

More than 26 million Americans have already cast their ballots for who they want to sit in the White House for the next four years, Trump or his Democratic rival Joe Biden.

Demonstrators at the Women’s March said they were angry that Republicans appear ready to confirm Barrett’s nomination so close to Election Day after refusing to move forward Merrick Garland, the pick of former President Barack Obama, a Democrat, more than six months ahead of the 2016 election.

“The fact of the matter is that we are powerful and they are afraid,” said Sonja Spoo, the director of the reproductive rights campaigns at UltraViolet, a feminist advocacy group, one of the speakers at the protest. “They are on the ropes and they know it and we are about to give the knock-out punch.”

Ginsburg, a liberal champion of women’s rights, died on Sept. 18.

Prudence Sullivan, 49, from Lake in the Hills, Illinois, near Chicago, and her sister Kelli Padgett, 47, from Jacksonville, Florida, flew in to join what they described as an energizing and empowering event.

“We’ve had losses from COVID and we’ve clashed with family members over racism, Black Lives Matter,” Sullivan said. “So this is something where I can put my money where my mouth is.”

Sullivan said she and her husband, an IT expert, were looking at options for moving overseas if Trump was reelected.

The protesters marched through downtown Washington to the Supreme Court steps. Hundreds of marches and demonstrations were planned https://map.womensmarch.com/?eventType=oct-17-march at city halls, parks and monuments across the country.

In confirmation hearings this week, Barrett side-stepped https://www.reuters.com/article/usa-court-barrett-climate/environmentalists-democrats-fault-trump-court-pick-barrett-on-climate-evasion-idINKBN2702L3 questions about presidential powers, abortion, climate change, voting rights and Obamacare, saying she could not answer because cases involving these matters could come before the court.

If Barrett takes a seat on the Supreme Court, conservatives would have a 6-3 majority.

(Reporting by Timothy Gardner; Addditional reporting by Andrea Shalal; Editing by Heather Timmons, Sonya Hepinstall and Daniel Wallis)

Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.

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As hundreds gather for Women’s March to protest Trump and Barrett’s nomination, dozens expected to rally in support

Nearly four years after millions of people worldwide protested the first day of President Donald Trump’s tenure, hundreds rallied in Washington, D.C., and marched to the National Mall on Saturday as thousands more joined virtual protests intended to galvanize voters ahead of Election Day.

Women’s March draws thousands to protest the Supreme Court nominee, Trump in Washington

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More than 116,000 people with Women’s March were expected to march or participate in other actions on Saturday, and more than 429 socially distanced and virtual sister marches were expected to take place in all 50 states, according to Women’s March organizers.

“The first Women’s March in 2017 was historic,” Rachel Carmona, executive director of Women’s March, said in a rally before the march Saturday afternoon in Washington, D.C. “Now four years later … with 17 days to go (until the election), we’re going to finish what we started.”

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The march in Washington was planned to culminate at the National Mall where organizers hoped to hold a virtual text banking telethon to send 5 million text messages to encourage people to vote. March organizers said they planned to honor the legacy of Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and contest Amy Coney Barrett’s confirmation to the court, which the Senate Judiciary Committee is expected to vote on Oct. 22.