Bay Area political events: Women’s Marches, voter suppression

Upcoming political events in the Bay Area. Events take place online unless otherwise noted:

SATURDAY

Women’s Marches: “March for Our Rights” social distance march. Hosted by Women’s March San Francisco, League of Women Voters San Francisco chapter, NARAL Pro-Choice California, Planned Parenthood Norther California, San Francisco Women’s Political Committee and the Women’s Building of San Francisco. 11 a.m., Civic Center Plaza, 335 McAllister St., San Francisco. More information is here. Numerous other Women’s Marches are being held in the Bay Area. A full list is here.

SUNDAY

ResistDance: An all-ages dance party to raise money for social justice causes. 10 a.m., Lucretia Edwards Shoreline Park, 1500 Marina Way South, Richmond. More information is here.

MONDAY

Rep. Ro Khanna: Fremont Democrat holds a town hall meeting. Noon. Submit a question in advance here; join the meeting here.

Who gets to vote? A forum on voter suppression and how to fight it. Panelists include California Secretary of State Alex Padilla and Ari Berman, senior reporter at Mother Jones. Hosted by the Commonwealth Club. 3 p.m. More information is here.

Fareed Zakaria: Host of CNN’s “Fareed Zakaria GPS” and Washington Post columnist on lessons for a post-pandemic world. Hosted by the Commonwealth Club. 6 p.m. More information is here.

TUESDAY

Gov. Andrew Cuomo: New York governor in conversation at the Commonwealth Club. Noon. More information is here.

Concentrated power: A discussion of monopoly power and how to combat it, with Barry Lynn, head of the Open Markets Institute and author or “Liberty from All Masters: The New American Autocracy vs. the Will of the People,” and Silicon Valley investor Roger McNamee, author of “Zucked: Waking Up to the Facebook Catastrophe.” Hosted by the Commonwealth Club. 3:30 p.m. More information is here.

WEDNESDAY

Sean Spicer: Former White House press secretary under President Trump in conversation at the Commonwealth Club. 10 a.m. More information is here.

Campus color line: Eddie Cole, associate professor of higher education and organizational change at UCLA and author of “The Campus Color Line,” on how civil rights issues have been intertwined with universities. Hosted by the Commonwealth Club. 1 p.m. More information is here.

W. Kamau Bell: The comedian and executive producer of the Emmy Award-winning CNN docu-series “United Shades of America,” in conversation with Chronicle senior political writer Joe Garofoli. Hosted by The Chronicle. 6 p.m. More information is here.

OCT. 24

March against extinction: A march with social distancing to support net-zero carbon emissions by 2025. Organized by XR America. Noon, gather at Union Square and march to City Hall, San Francisco. More information is here.

OCT. 27

Conservatism: Edmund Fawcett, former European and literary editor of the Economist and author of “Conservatism: The Fight for a Tradition,” discusses the history and internal battles and tensions of conservative ideology. Hosted by the Commonwealth Club. 10 a.m. More information is here.

Women in politics: Chronicle columnist Heather Knight and Washington correspondent Tal Kopan lead a discussion on women in politics, with Rep. Katie Porter, D-Irvine; Emerge President

Women’s Marches Spark Accusations of COVID Hypocrisy From All Directions

As thousands of women gathered to participate in Women’s March events held throughout the U.S. on Saturday, critics raised questions about the safety of holding the marches at a time when COVID-19 cases were spiking in several states.



text: Demonstrators march during the #CountonUs March Women's Voter Rally on October 17, 2020, in Washington, D.C. As thousands gathered in the nation's capital and across the U.S., critics questioned whether holding the in-person events was wise at a time when COVID-19 cases were spiking in several states.


© Paul Morigi/Getty
Demonstrators march during the #CountonUs March Women’s Voter Rally on October 17, 2020, in Washington, D.C. As thousands gathered in the nation’s capital and across the U.S., critics questioned whether holding the in-person events was wise at a time when COVID-19 cases were spiking in several states.

According to event organizers, more than 425 Women’s March events were expected to be held either in person or virtually on Saturday. Organizers said on the Women’s March Facebook page that the in-person events would be socially distanced.

Video shared online of the march in Washington, D.C., appeared to show participants packed together as they marched and hoisted signs, many of which called for an end to President Donald Trump’s time in office. The very first Women’s March was held the day after Trump’s inauguration in 2017.

Organizers of Saturday’s flagship event in Washington, D.C., were permitted to have 10,000 participants, according to NPR—far below the hundreds of thousands who participated in the very first march nearly four years ago.

“But then again, there’s a pandemic,” NPR reporter Sarah McCammon said of the crowd size on Twitter.

The event webpage outlined safety precautions from organizers that included a mask requirement, an encouragement to practice social distancing, hand sanitizer provisions and proddings for would-be participants to stay home if they were experiencing possible COVID-19 symptoms. Organizers also distributed masks to participants who needed them and projected social distancing reminders on LED screens in the area.

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“Why no media outrage about the crowd size,” Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan, a Republican, said as he retweeted a post of the crowd gathered in the nation’s capital. “Or do #COVIDー19 rules only apply when you go to church, college football games, and Trump rallies?”

One Twitter user addressed the crowd size in Washington, D.C., and referenced a recommendation that Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and member of the White House coronavirus task force, made earlier this week about avoiding large family gatherings this Thanksgiving.

“I’d like Dr. Fauci to weigh in on what he thinks about this #WomensMarch2020 event during a pandemic after his canceling Thanksgiving remarks,” @ChuckRichter70 wrote. Another Twitter user wrote, “Corona Virus for Trump Rallies and football games bad actually called super spreaders. #WomensMarch2020 nothing to see move on.”

After local media outlets in Minnesota reported that one Women’s March planned to take place near the state capitol was cancelled after the Minnesota attorney general said organizers would

Women’s Marches Bring Thousands To Washington, D.C., And Cities Nationwide : NPR

Protesters rally in Washington, D.C., during the latest Women’s March, demonstrations that began just after President Trump’s inauguration.

Carol Guzy for NPR


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Carol Guzy for NPR

Protesters rally in Washington, D.C., during the latest Women’s March, demonstrations that began just after President Trump’s inauguration.

Carol Guzy for NPR

Updated at 6:08 p.m. ET

Thousands of people gathered Saturday in Washington, D.C., and in hundreds of cities across the country for the fifth Women’s March.

The latest iteration of the protest event — first held the day after President Trump’s 2017 inauguration — comes 17 days before Election Day and as Republican senators move to quickly confirm the president’s third Supreme Court nominee, Judge Amy Coney Barrett.

Jade Tisdol from Boston takes part in the Women’s March in Washington, D.C., on Saturday.

Carol Guzy for NPR


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Carol Guzy for NPR

Jade Tisdol from Boston takes part in the Women’s March in Washington, D.C., on Saturday.

Carol Guzy for NPR

The controversial election-year nomination was a central focus during this year’s events, motivating rallies and marches throughout the day. If confirmed, Barrett would succeed the feminist icon Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a champion of gender equality during her nearly three decades on the court.

Saturday’s tent-pole event in Washington was permitted for 10,000 attendees. Organizers said that in total, more than 400 events were planned throughout the country.

Protesters in Washington, D.C., are rallying against President Trump and the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court.

Carol Guzy for NPR


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Carol Guzy for NPR

Protesters in Washington, D.C., are rallying against President Trump and the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court.

Carol Guzy for NPR

With Election Day just over two weeks away, mobilizing women to vote was a central theme, alongside other women’s rights issues.

In D.C., Sonja Spoo, a reproductive rights activist, said, “Donald Trump is leaving office and there is no choice for him — it is our choice — and we are voting him out come Nov. 3.”

Rocky dons a Ginsburg collar for the Women’s March in Washington, D.C.

Carol Guzy for NPR


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Rocky dons a Ginsburg collar for the Women’s March in Washington, D.C.

Carol Guzy for NPR

One of the largest events planned for Saturday happened in the nation’s capital, where nearly four years ago hundreds of thousands gathered a day after Trump was sworn in.

Though smaller than the historic 2017 crowd, women’s rights advocates came in droves.

Participants carried signs blasting President Trump and supporting Democratic opponent Joe Biden and running mate Kamala Harris.

Hundreds of people gathered on Boston Common on for the fourth Women’s March since Donald Trump took office in 2016.

Meredith Nierman/WGBH


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Hundreds of people gathered on Boston Common on for the fourth Women’s March since Donald Trump took office in 2016.

Meredith Nierman/WGBH

Brianna Sink

Organizers Urge Vote For Change At U.S. Women’s Marches

Reporting by The Associated Press:

WASHINGTON, DC — Thousands of mostly young women in masks rallied Saturday in the nation’s capital and other U.S. cities, exhorting voters to oppose President Donald Trump and his fellow Republican candidates in the Nov. 3 elections.

The latest of rallies that began with a massive women’s march the day after Trump’s January 2017 inauguration was playing out during the coronavirus pandemic, and demonstrators were asked to wear face coverings and practice social distancing.

Rachel O’Leary Carmona, executive director of the Women’s March, opened the event by asking people to keep their distance from one another, saying that the only superspreader event would be the recent one at the White House.

She talked about the power of women to end Trump’s presidency.

“His presidency began with women marching and now it’s going to end with woman voting. Period,” she said.

“Vote for your daughter’s future,” read one message in the sea of signs carried by demonstrators. “Fight like a girl,” said another.

Dozens of other rallies were planned from New York to San Francisco to signal opposition to Trump and his policies, especially the push to fill the seat of late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before Election Day.

One march was held at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, outside the dormitory where Bader Ginsburg lived as an undergraduate student.

In New York, a demonstrator wearing a Donald Trump mask stood next to a statue of George Washington at Federal Hall during the the women’s march outside the New York Stock Exchange.

“We Dissent,” said a cardboard sign carried by a young woman wearing a red mask with small portraits of the liberal Supreme Court justice whose Sept. 18 death sparked the rush by Republicans to replace her with a conservative.

In Washington, the demonstrators started with a rally at Freedom Plaza, then marched toward Capitol Hill, finishing in front of the Supreme Court, where they were met by a handful of anti-abortion activists.

In one of several speeches at the rally, Sonja Spoo, director of reproductive rights campaigns at Ultraviolet, said she has to chuckle when she hears reporters ask Trump whether he will accept a peaceful transfer of power if he loses his reelection bid.

“When we vote him out, come Nov. 3, there is no choice,” said Spoo. “Donald Trump will not get to choose whether he stays in power.”

“That is not his power, that is our power. … We are the hell and high water,” she said.

This article originally appeared on the White House Patch

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