Whoa! Sam’s Club Launches Virtual Holiday Shopping Experience Inside National Lampoon’s -Inspired Home

Courtesy Sam’s Club

Amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, holiday shopping is looking very different this year. But the elves at Sam’s Club have been working overtime to bring a unique experience to life to infuse more fun into our online shopping.

The bulk discount retailer has launched a very special virtual holiday shopping experience, where shoppers can browse through the make-believe home of the famed Griswold family from the National Lampoon Vacation movies. Specifically, prepare to be dazzled by their imaginary National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation home complete with movie trivia, interactive elements (like a squirrel in the Christmas tree and Aunt Bethany’s cat tucked into a gift box), and fabulous lights. From Sam’s Club digital landing page, you can shop their top gifts, toys, food, and more for the holiday season, all while making Cousin Eddie, Clark, Ellen, Rusty, Audrey, and Aunt Edna oh-so-delighted. In addition to holiday must-haves, the reimagined Griswold family home also features some items that tip their hats to classic scenes from the movie. (For instance, as you may spy in the photo below, Sam’s Club included the Little Giant ladder as a gift from Ellen, as a tribute to when Clark is struggling with the ladder while he hangs the Christmas lights.)

So how’s it work? It’s pretty simple. While shoppers tour the exterior of the twinkly abode and inside the home, they can click on the red dots to get information on the items and directly buy, say, a Christmas tree or Dutch oven. And if you’re not ready to shop quite yet, it’s a great way to round up some ideas for your holiday wish list.

As Sam’s Club spokesperson Laura Ladd Poff puts it, “If this year has a silver lining, it’s that we’re all finding ways to stay connected in really creative ways—Sam’s Club included—by introducing new experiences that make shopping easy and fun.” Needless to say, as fans of this classic holiday movie, we’re pretty stoked to see all that’s inside this decked-out home.

Courtesy Sam’s Club

Christmas Vacation was actually released in December of 1989 (that’s 31 years ago for those trying to do the math). And, if were catching up with the Griswold family today, things may look a bit different. At least we hope some of the wallpaper came down and the plaid sofas had been recovered,” says Ladd Poff. “We think this movie resonates with all of us in that Clark’s goal throughout the movie was to create perfect holiday memories but everything was  greatly interrupted by things outside of his control and that’s basically the story of all of 2020. But we’re here to celebrate the fact that even though nothing has gone to plan this year, we can still, as Clark says, ‘have hap-hap-happiest Christmas since’… well you know the rest of the quote!”

WATCH: Tour Sam’s Club Virtual National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation-inspired Holiday Shopping Experience

Whoa! Sam’s Club Launches Virtual Holiday Shopping Experience Inside National Lampoon’s-Inspired Home

Whoa! Sam’s

Holiday shoppers to spend less in 2020: National Retail Federation

Shoppers walk past the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree in New York.

Getty Images

As holiday shoppers look for gifts, they plan to spend less overall and pull back on purchases for themselves, according to a survey by the National Retail Federation.

The retail industry trade group said Wednesday that consumers expect to spend $997.79 on gifts, holiday items like food and decorations and additional “non-gift” purchases, according to a survey of 7,660 consumers conducted in early October. That’s a drop of about $50 from last year’s survey.

Nearly all of that drop came from people who say they are hesitant to buy items for themselves or their families that aren’t gifts while they are holiday shopping, even if there’s a big sale, the survey found. They plan to spend a little less on gifts than last year, a drop of about $8, according to the survey.

Despite the decline, expected holiday spending is higher than the five-year average for gifts and decor, NRF said.

The coronavirus pandemic has shaken up the way shoppers plan to celebrate the holidays, too, according to the survey. One in five people surveyed said they typically travel for the holidays, but will celebrate at home instead this year.

The drop in travel spending could add up to more sales for retailers. A little over half of the shoppers surveyed said they’ll put some of the money they’d otherwise spend on travel expenses like plane tickets and gas toward holiday items instead.

And shoppers want to get into the spirit of the season. Shoppers plan to spend slightly more on holiday decor this year — a bright spot for retailers and a reflection of Americans’ focus on sprucing up their homes as they spend more time there.

NRF typically shares a holiday forecast in early October, but has yet to weigh in. Consulting firms have started to paint a picture of how the season may shape up. In a survey by Accenture, consumers said they plan to spend $540 on holiday shopping this year. That’s about $100 less than they planned to spend last year. Deloitte predicted holiday retail sales will rise slightly, by 1 to 1.5%.

Source Article

National Alliance reveals shocking truths about the world’s leading killer of women

OTTAWA, Oct. 21, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the country’s leading cause of premature death in women. The Canadian Women’s Heart Health Alliance (CWHHA), a national network of women’s heart health experts and advocates powered by the Canadian Women’s Heart Health Centre (CWHHC) at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute (UOHI), released eye-opening research this week revealing the scope of the problem.

The Canadian Women’s Heart Health Alliance ATLAS on the Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Management of Cardiovascular Disease in Women – Chapter 2: Scope of the Problem is published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology Open. It is the second chapter in a series of nine to be published chronologically within the year.

“The Canadian Women’s Heart Health Alliance ATLAS aims to guide clinicians and the public in recognizing the unique aspects of women’s heart health care while providing policy makers with information they need to ensure equitable care for women with CVDs,” says Dr. Colleen Norris, a professor in the Faculty of Nursing at the University of Alberta and scientific director of the Cardiovascular Health & Stroke Strategic Clinical Network with Alberta Health Services. Dr. Norris chairs the CWHHA’s Health Systems and Policy Working Group and is the paper’s senior author. “Most people are unaware that cardiovascular conditions are a woman’s main health threat, leading to more hospitalizations and deaths every year than other health conditions. In Chapter 2 of the ATLAS, we summarize the impacts of CVDs among Canadian women, we highlight sex and gender gaps in research and treatment, and, we look at how being female overlaps with other factors that affect CVD outcomes in women, including Indigenous identity, ethnicity, disability, and socioeconomic status.”

Some of the key findings are highlighted below:

  • Coronary artery disease (CAD), including myocardial infarction (heart attack), and followed by stroke, are accountable for most CVD-related deaths in women.

  • Most emergency department visits and hospitalizations by women are due to CAD, heart failure, and stroke.

  • Indigenous women in Canada experience increased CVD, linked to colonization and subsequent social, economic and political challenges.

  • Women from racial and ethnic backgrounds (i.e., South Asian, Afro-Caribbean, Hispanic, and Chinese North-American women) have greater CVD risk factors, and CVD risk in East Asian women increases with duration of stay in Canada.

  • Canadians living in northern, rural, remote and on-reserve residences experience greater CVD morbidity, mortality and risk factors.

  • Increase in CVD risk among Canadian women has been linked with lower socioeconomic status background and women with disabilities have an increased risk of adverse cardiac events.

“In the year 2020, women continue to be under-aware, under-researched, under-diagnosed, and under-treated when it comes to cardiovascular conditions,” says Dr. Thais Coutinho, head of the Division of Cardiac Prevention and Rehabilitation at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, chair of the CWHHC, and chair of the CWHHA’s Executive Steering Committee. “The Canadian Women’s Heart Health Alliance ATLAS is the most comprehensive review of its kind, summarizing the state of women’s heart health in Canada. Chapter 2 forms the

Border closure can’t keep grandparents from Canadian wedding | National News

ST. STEPHEN, New Brunswick (AP) — With the border closed, a Canadian couple still found a way for their grandparents from Maine to see their waterfront wedding.

It involved a boat used for hauling lobster traps, naturally.

Alex Leckie and Lindsay Clowes were married on a wharf in St. Stephen, New Brunswick, while the bride’s grandparents and a few other relatives from Calais, Maine, watched from a boat in the St. Croix river that divides the countries. Other families and friends watched from Maine.

“It was happy and emotional and overwhelming,” Clowes said of seeing family and friends on both sides of the border.

The idea for the wedding was hatched after the couple had to cancel a summer wedding in Nova Scotia because of the closed border and travel restrictions. The St. Stephen wedding allowed families on both sides of the border to participate. Clowes grew up in Calais, Maine, and attended school in St. Stephen, New Brunswick.

“To sum it up, my wife came up with the hashtag, #loveisnotcancelled,” said Chris Bernardini, whose wife, Leslie, is mother of the bride.

Bernardini and his wife, from Calais, were able to cross the border and quarantine in Canada before the wedding because both hold dual citizenships.

But it took some Maine ingenuity for other family members to be able to see the wedding. That involved using the 19-foot skiff used for hauling lobster traps that belonged to Bernardini’s father.

Source Article

Photo exhibit at the National Museum of Industrial History highlights the beauty of machines

Some would see old subway cars abandoned in a recycling yard as nothing more than hulking chunks of metal waiting to be squashed flat as a pancake.

Not photographer Stephen Mallon.

Mallon, a critically-acclaimed photographer, finds history and beauty in old machines and captures that in his shots. A new exhibit of his work, “Machines of Interest: The Selected Works of Stephen Mallon” is now on display at the National Museum of Industrial History in South Bethlehem.

His work promises to make you look differently at industrial machines.

The exhibit features more than two dozen original prints from the New-York based photographer. You’ll see photos from the artist’s collection spanning life on the rails to deconstruction in the recycling yard to unique perspectives of human-made machines.

“Stephen’s crisp, detailed, and beautiful images are something to behold,” said Glenn Koehler, director of Marketing and Public Relations at NMIH in a prepared statement. “His eye for finding beauty in industrial landscapes and his diverse body of work will resonate with everyone from art enthusiasts to engineers to hobby photographers.”

Mallon is well known for his series “Next Stop Atlantic” featuring decommissioned NYC Subway cars as they are retired to the depths of the Atlantic Ocean as artificial reefs, as well as his series “Brace for Impact,” which chronicles the reclamation of the plane successfully landed in the waters of the Hudson River by Capt. “Sully” Sullenburger.

Mallon’s work has been exhibited in museums and galleries internationally, and his work has been he subject of publications such as National Geographic, The New Yorker, New York Times, Vanity Fair, Wired, Stern, PetaPixel, Viral Forest, BuzzFeed, New York Magazine, and The Huffington Post. Mallon’s work has also been featured on CNN, CBS, MSNBC, and NPR.

The exhibit runs through March 7.

“Machines of Interest: The Selected Works of Stephen Mallon” is in included in regular museum admission. How much: Children six and younger, free; youth (7 to 17): $9; students: $9; veterans/educators/seniors (65 and older): $11; and adults (18 to 64): $12.

The museum, which opened in 2016 and is a Smithsonian Institution affiliate, was built out of Bethlehem Steel’s 1913 Electric Repair Shop and tells the story of the Industrial Revolution in America. It is currently operating on modified hours and procedures due to the COVID-19 pandemic. For current hours and protocols please visit https://www.nmih.org/nmih-reopening/ for the most up-to-date information.

The National Museum of Industrial History is at 602 E. 2nd St., Bethlehem.

Info: https://www.nmih.org/machines-of-interest; or 610-694-6644 x 108.

———

©2020 The Morning Call (Allentown, Pa.)

Visit The Morning Call (Allentown, Pa.) at www.mcall.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Continue Reading

Source Article

Women in military honored in new monument at Arlington National Cemetery

A new monument honoring all military servicewomen has been unveiled at Arlington National Cemetery.



a man riding a horse: This undated photo provided by Bahary Studios shows a sculpture called "The Pledge." The new sculpture honoring military women and military working dogs is being unveiled outside Arlington National Cemetery.


© Luke Homay/Bahary Studios via AP
This undated photo provided by Bahary Studios shows a sculpture called “The Pledge.” The new sculpture honoring military women and military working dogs is being unveiled outside Arlington National Cemetery.

The life-size bronze sculpture, titled “The Pledge,” shows a woman in full combat uniform bonding with a service dog.

MORE: Bronze statue of Ruth Bader Ginsburg to be unveiled in Brooklyn during Women’s History Month

“‘The Pledge’ captures a brief private moment of mutual respect and love, with duty calling,” the description of the statute on the website of sculptor Susan Bahary reads. “They pledge to support each other, doing the best they can to accomplish their important mission and stay safe.”



a man riding a horse: This undated photo provided by Bahary Studios shows a sculpture called "The Pledge." The new sculpture honoring military women and military working dogs is being unveiled outside Arlington National Cemetery.


© Luke Homay/Bahary Studios via AP
This undated photo provided by Bahary Studios shows a sculpture called “The Pledge.” The new sculpture honoring military women and military working dogs is being unveiled outside Arlington National Cemetery.

The monument, commissioned by the U.S. War Dogs Association, was unveiled on Saturday and is available for public viewing starting Sunday in an open house event. It is located at the Women In Military Service For America Memorial at the entrance of the cemetery.

“The Pledge honors the commitment of our brave servicewomen in all the jobs they do,” Bahary wrote.

MORE: Army sentinels stand watch at Tomb of Unknowns during pandemic

Tickets to view the sculpture are free, but space is limited due to COVID-19.

Gallery: Coronavirus changing the way people worship (USA TODAY)

Continue Reading

Source Article

New monument at Arlington National Cemetery honors women in military

“The Pledge” statue shows a servicewoman bonding with a service dog.

A new monument honoring all military servicewomen has been unveiled at Arlington National Cemetery.

The life-size bronze sculpture, titled “The Pledge,” shows a woman in full combat uniform bonding with a service dog.

“‘The Pledge’ captures a brief private moment of mutual respect and love, with duty calling,” the description of the statute on the website of sculptor Susan Bahary reads. “They pledge to support each other, doing the best they can to accomplish their important mission and stay safe.”

The monument, commissioned by the U.S. War Dogs Association, was unveiled on Saturday and is available for public viewing starting Sunday in an open house event. It is located at the Women In Military Service For America Memorial at the entrance of the cemetery.

“The Pledge honors the commitment of our brave servicewomen in all the jobs they do,” Bahary wrote.

Tickets to view the sculpture are free, but space is limited due to COVID-19.

Source Article

Stanford star Catarina Macario ready for new chapter with U.S. women’s national team

After eight years of waiting, hoping and navigating a complicated process, Catarina Macario spent less time completing her U.S. citizenship than she does playing a soccer game.

Called to an immigration office in San Jose, California, last week for her citizenship test, Macario answered six questions posed by her case officer. After she answered all six correctly, she was presented with a packet that included her certificate of naturalization. In normal times, Macario might have scheduled an appointment to return for a swearing-in ceremony. In coronavirus-pandemic times, the official told her she could wait around for an ad hoc ceremony in the parking lot with other successful applicants or take care of it right away in the office.

The Stanford senior opted for the latter.

“Honestly, I had midterms and I almost just wanted to get it over with,” Macario said. “I was by myself anyway, so I just chose the easier route.”

Hours before the Brazilian-born Macario officially became an American citizen, U.S. Soccer announced she was among the players whom Vlatko Andonovski invited to the women’s national team training camp on October. Her first call to the senior national team coincides with that team’s first activities since March and first tentative steps toward next summer’s rescheduled Olympics.

• ‘Next Gen United’ players run for U.S. Soccer Athlete Council
• U.S. camp without Morgan, Lavelle, Press
• Ex-U.S. boss Ellis urges for more women coaches

The 10-day camp in Colorado, which will be conducted in a bubble and under strict COVID-19 protocols, is an afterthought to some. Much of the core of the team that won the 2019 Women’s World Cup and qualified for the Olympics will be absent. Tobin Heath, Rose Lavelle, Alex Morgan and Sam Mewis are in England. Carli Lloyd and Megan Rapinoe are injured or absent by choice. But for many of the 27 invitees, the camp is a chance to make an impression with a new coach who is planning not just for the Olympics next year, but the 2023 World Cup.

For Macario, who moves one step closer to becoming the first naturalized citizen to play for the women’s team, the camp was a lifetime in the making.

“The fact that it all happened the same day was just really magical,” Macario said. “I know that Oct. 8 will forever be a very important date in my calendar.”

Macario was ecstatic when she got the email informing her of the impending camp invite a few days before the official announcement, but she was also apprehensive when she spoke with Andonovski. She told him she was grateful for the call-up but worried that she might not be able to put her best foot forward.

USWNT coach Vlatko Andonovski believes that anyone who has seen Macario play for Stanford knows that she is a special talent. Robin Alam/Icon Sportswire via Getty