Women’s Marches Bring Thousands To Washington, D.C., And Cities Nationwide : NPR

Protesters rally in Washington, D.C., during the latest Women’s March, demonstrations that began just after President Trump’s inauguration.

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Protesters rally in Washington, D.C., during the latest Women’s March, demonstrations that began just after President Trump’s inauguration.

Carol Guzy for NPR

Updated at 6:08 p.m. ET

Thousands of people gathered Saturday in Washington, D.C., and in hundreds of cities across the country for the fifth Women’s March.

The latest iteration of the protest event — first held the day after President Trump’s 2017 inauguration — comes 17 days before Election Day and as Republican senators move to quickly confirm the president’s third Supreme Court nominee, Judge Amy Coney Barrett.

Jade Tisdol from Boston takes part in the Women’s March in Washington, D.C., on Saturday.

Carol Guzy for NPR


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Jade Tisdol from Boston takes part in the Women’s March in Washington, D.C., on Saturday.

Carol Guzy for NPR

The controversial election-year nomination was a central focus during this year’s events, motivating rallies and marches throughout the day. If confirmed, Barrett would succeed the feminist icon Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a champion of gender equality during her nearly three decades on the court.

Saturday’s tent-pole event in Washington was permitted for 10,000 attendees. Organizers said that in total, more than 400 events were planned throughout the country.

Protesters in Washington, D.C., are rallying against President Trump and the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court.

Carol Guzy for NPR


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Protesters in Washington, D.C., are rallying against President Trump and the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court.

Carol Guzy for NPR

With Election Day just over two weeks away, mobilizing women to vote was a central theme, alongside other women’s rights issues.

In D.C., Sonja Spoo, a reproductive rights activist, said, “Donald Trump is leaving office and there is no choice for him — it is our choice — and we are voting him out come Nov. 3.”

Rocky dons a Ginsburg collar for the Women’s March in Washington, D.C.

Carol Guzy for NPR


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Rocky dons a Ginsburg collar for the Women’s March in Washington, D.C.

Carol Guzy for NPR

One of the largest events planned for Saturday happened in the nation’s capital, where nearly four years ago hundreds of thousands gathered a day after Trump was sworn in.

Though smaller than the historic 2017 crowd, women’s rights advocates came in droves.

Participants carried signs blasting President Trump and supporting Democratic opponent Joe Biden and running mate Kamala Harris.

Hundreds of people gathered on Boston Common on for the fourth Women’s March since Donald Trump took office in 2016.

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Hundreds of people gathered on Boston Common on for the fourth Women’s March since Donald Trump took office in 2016.

Meredith Nierman/WGBH

Brianna Sink

Nationwide Women’s March Protests Donald Trump, Amy Coney Barrett

Thousands of people in masks rallied Saturday in Washington D.C. to protest President Donald Trump and his nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to fill the seat of late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

The rally resembled that of January 2017, when young women and gender minorities across the country gathered to protest the president’s inauguration.

Rachel O’Leary Carmona, executive director of Women’s March, kicked off the rally by asking attendees to maintain their distance from one another, adding that the only “superspreader event” would be the recent one at the White House. “His presidency began with women marching and now it’s going to end with woman voting. Period,” said Carmona.

Reproductive rights activist Sonja Spoo echoed Carmona, saying “there is no choice” but to vote Trump out of office. “We are the hell and the high water. Donald Trump is leaving office, and there is no choice for him,” she said. “Come Nov. 3, it will because of women – especially Black, brown and Indigenous women – stepping up and saying enough.”

According to a statement on the Women’s March website, organizers hope to “send an unmistakable message about the fierce opposition to Trump and his agenda, including his attempt to fill Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat.”

The organization, with the help of demonstrators, also plans on sending over five million text messages, asking female voters to take action in the upcoming election.

Other rallies were organized from New York to San Francisco to signal opposition to Trump’s push to fill the seat of the late Justice Ginsburg before Election Day.

Trump nominated Barrett last month following the death of the late justice, and her confirmation hearings took place this past week. The Senate Judiciary Committee is expected to vote on Barrett’s confirmation on Oct. 22.

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