Royal Navy using flying Iron Man-style jet suits to practice storming enemy ships


THIS is the incredible moment the Royal Navy is seen practising confronting enemy ships with a real life Iron Man-style jet suit. 

In one video, a man clad in the suit is seen flying through the air from a sea vessel before landing on a ship. 

The man is seen flying in the air as he storms a ship

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The man is seen flying in the air as he storms a shipCredit: Twitter
Four men also are seen taking off in the air before landing safely on a ship

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Four men also are seen taking off in the air before landing safely on a shipCredit: Twitter

He then makes his way back to the vessel he took off from.

In another amazing scene, four men in jet suits are seen effortlessly elevating themselves towards a ship. 

The men are seen launching themselves from a vessel, then flying high in the sky before landing on the ship. 

They congratulate each other by shaking hands once they are securely on the ship. 

The action packed video was shared by the U.S. Naval Institute on their twitter feed with the caption: “The Royal Navy has been testing Jet Suit assault teams to determine if the Iron Man-like suits could be used to rapidly swarm and board ships.”

It also said the U.S. Special Operations Command is “also evaluating a jet pack that can reach speeds of more than 200mph”.  

The Jet Suit was made by Gravity Industries, a British tech startup firm. 

The suits have been around the world with boss Richard Browning demonstrating how they work.

With a flight time of eight minutes, they give the wearer the ability to fly by way of five mini jet engines. 

The wearer has four of the mini jet engines strapped to his hands and one on his back.

The jets are said to be able to reach a speed capacity of 55mph. 

They are also able to generate a stunning 1000bhp (brake horse power, the equivalent of a Bugatti Veyron supercar.

Last month, a jet suit for paramedics was tested by the Great North Air Ambulance Service. 

A test flight was conducted over the Lake District. 

It is said the flying paramedics would be able to reach patients within minutes. 

The videos were shared on the Twitter page of the U.S. Naval Institute

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The videos were shared on the Twitter page of the U.S. Naval InstituteCredit: Twitter
The U.S. Naval Institute said U.S. Special Operations Command is 'also evaluating a jet pack that can reach speeds of more than 200mph'

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The U.S. Naval Institute said U.S. Special Operations Command is ‘also evaluating a jet pack that can reach speeds of more than 200mph’Credit: Twitter

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Video shows Royal Navy using flying Iron Man-style jet suits as they practise storming enemy ships

Britain’s jetpack commandos of the future: The Royal Navy enlists stunt men in Iron Man-style jet suits to prove how jetpacks could be used to storm ships

  • The ‘wearable flight system’ has five engines mounted to the arms and the back 
  • Jet suit can fly for up to eight minutes at a time and reach speeds of over 55mph
  • The jet-powered suit produces over 1,000 brake horsepower to gain flight

This amazing video shows the Royal Navy using flying Iron Man-style jet suits as they practice storming enemy ships.  

One man donning a jet-powered, carbon-fibre suit is seen launching off a vessel and effortlessly fly several feet into the air.

Like something out of a Hollywood blockbuster, after a brief period to stabilise over the water, the man then storms a ship by landing on it.

He then reverses his journey, glides off the ship back up into the air and hovers onto the vessel he came from.

A second clip from the same footage shared by the U.S. Naval Institute on their Twitter feed shows four men, again clad in Jet Suits, simultaneously launch themselves off a vessel flying in the direction of a ship in the middle of the ocean.

One by one they are seen climbing high into the skies circulating the ship before taking turns to safely land onto it and shaking each others hands in victory.  

This Jet Suit claded man is seen climbing high into the skies circulating the ship before landing on it

This Jet Suit claded man is seen climbing high into the skies circulating the ship before landing on it

This Jet Suit claded man is seen climbing high into the skies circulating the ship before landing on it

The 'wearable flight system' has five engines mounted to the arms and the back and can reach speeds of over 55mph

The 'wearable flight system' has five engines mounted to the arms and the back and can reach speeds of over 55mph

The ‘wearable flight system’ has five engines mounted to the arms and the back and can reach speeds of over 55mph

The marvelous Jet Suit creation is a device from British tech startup firm Gravity Industries.

Its founder, Richard Browning, has previously demonstrated the suit in a number of countries around the world. 

It gives the wearer full control to fly through the power of five mini jet engines with a flight time of eight minutes.

The Jet Suit gives the wearer full control to fly through the power of five mini jet engines with a flight time of eight minutes.

The Jet Suit gives the wearer full control to fly through the power of five mini jet engines with a flight time of eight minutes.

The Jet Suit gives the wearer full control to fly through the power of five mini jet engines with a flight time of eight minutes.

The marvelous Jet Suit creation is a device from British tech startup firm Gravity Industries

The marvelous Jet Suit creation is a device from British tech startup firm Gravity Industries

The marvelous Jet Suit creation is a device from British tech startup firm Gravity Industries

Producing over 1,000 brake horsepower to gain flight, it can reach speeds of over 55mph.    

Along with the 94-second Twitter footage, the U.S. Naval Institute posted: ‘The Royal Navy has been testing Jet Suit assault teams to determine if the Iron Man-like suits could be used to rapidly swarm and board ships.

‘U.S. Special Operations Command is also evaluating a jetpack that can reach speeds of more than 200 mph.’ 

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Navy vs. East Carolina odds, line: 2020 college football picks, Week 7 predictions from proven model

An American Athletic battle is on tap between the Navy Midshipmen and the East Carolina Pirates at noon ET on Saturday at Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium. East Carolina is 1-2 overall and 0-1 at home, while Navy is 2-2 overall and 1-1 on the road. It’s just the eighth time the two programs have gone head-to-head with all eight meetings taking place since 2006. Navy holds a 6-1 edge in the series.

Last season, Navy won 42-10 as 7.5-point favorites and the Midshipmen have now covered in each of the last four matchups between these two schools. The Midshipmen are favored by 2.5-points in the latest Navy vs. East Carolina odds from William Hill, and the over-under is at 55.5. Before entering any East Carolina vs. Navy picks, you’ll want to see the college football predictions from the proven computer model at SportsLine.

The SportsLine Projection Model simulates every FBS college football game 10,,000 times. Over the past four-plus years, the proprietary computer model has generated a stunning profit of over $4,,200 for $100 players on its top-rated college football picks against the spread. It is a sizzling 23-6 on top-rated picks through six weeks of the 2020 college football season, returning almost $1,,300 in profit already. Anyone who has followed it has seen huge returns.

Now, the model has set its sights on Navy vs. East Carolina. You can head to SportsLine to see its picks. Here are several college football odds for East Carolina vs. Navy:

  • Navy vs. East Carolina spread: Navy -2.5
  • Navy vs. East Carolina over-under: 55.5 points
  • Navy vs. East Carolina money line: East Carolina +120, Navy -140

What you need to know about Navy

The Midshipmen sure made it a nail-biter, but they managed to escape with a 31-29 win over the Temple Owls on Saturday. Navy’s FB Nelson Smith was one of the most active players for the squad, rushing for two TDs and 120 yards on 20 carries. This was the first time Smith has racked up 100+ rushing yards all year.

Smith now leads the team with four rushing touchdowns and you can expect him to see a heavy dose of carries on Saturday against an ECU defense that is giving up nearly 188 rushing yards per game in 2020. After winning as four-point underdogs last week, the Midshipmen have covered in six of their last seven games dating back to last season. 

What you need to know about East Carolina

Meanwhile, East Carolina strolled past the South Florida Bulls with points to spare on Saturday, taking the matchup 44-24. QB Holton Ahlers and RB Rahjai Harris were among the main playmakers for East Carolina as the former passed for three TDs and 222 yards on 26 attempts in addition to picking up 35 yards on the ground. Harris rushed for two TDs and 115 yards on 19 carries. Near the top of the highlight reel was Ahlers’ 75-yard TD bomb to WR C.J. Johnson in the first quarter.

East Carolina enters Saturday’s

DVIDS – News – Navy Clothing and Textile Research Facility Pivots 3D Knitting Research to Face Covering Development


The Navy Clothing and Textile Research Facility (NCTRF) announced the commencement of a study and evaluation of 3D knitted face coverings. NCTRF is a business line of the Navy Exchange Service Command (NEXCOM), whose parent command is Naval Supply Systems Command (NAVSUP). As such, in March 2020, NAVSUP directed NCTRF to pivot their 3D knitting research from Flight Deck Jerseys to personal protective face coverings to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

“At the onset of COVID-19, when the Honorable James Geurts asked to pull together ideas to respond to COVID-19 and support the defense industrial base, the Navy’s Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR)/Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) team rose to the challenge,” said Brian Shipley, Commercialization Program Manager, Department of the Navy’s SBIR/STTR Program Office. “This effort was quickly determined to be a way to pivot an existing SBIR Phase II project to support COVID-related efforts to assemble a solution using technology already in development in our SBIR Program.”

“The utilization of 3D knitting technology has proven to provide a more streamlined and efficient approach to producing an item,” said Laurra Winters, Director of NCTRF. “Our continued work with small businesses and new technologies like 3D knitting will continue to move technology forward and greatly benefit our Navy’s warfighters.”

Using the standards of the N95 mask as a baseline, NCTRF developed the laboratory evaluation protocol for these non-medical face coverings. The yarns used to construct the 3D knitted face coverings are evaluated for comfort and filtration efficiency and the designs are assessed for durability.

A wear test was conducted over the summer and included a broad range of participants within NAVSUP, NEXCOM and Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA). Using data collected during the wear test of the initial prototypes, a second face covering prototype was developed with design and performance improvements. The wear test of the second prototype will occur this fall.

“Assembling a team and collaborating on solving a problem by identifying a technological solution has served as a great example of our ‘Team of Teams’ approach to innovation at NAVSUP,” said Karl Larson, Command Science Advisor and Innovation Program Manager, NAVSUP.

Seamless 3D knit technology enables rapid prototyping, short lead times and sustainable production of textile products. The evaluation of the second prototype is expected to conclude by the end of 2020, with anticipated commercialization in 2021. NCTRF will continue to pursue new technologies and present new solutions to meet the requirements of Sailors within variable Navy environments.

The Navy Exchange Service Command is one of 11commands under Commander, NAVSUP. NEXCOM oversees six business lines that include Navy Exchange (NEX) stores, Navy Lodges, the Ships Store Program, the Uniform Program Management Office, the Navy Clothing and Textile Research Facility and the Telecommunications Program Office. NEXCOM’s mission is to provide authorized customers quality goods and services at a savings and to support Navy quality of life programs for active duty military, retirees, reservists and their families. Since 1946, NEXCOM has given $3.6 billion to support Navy MWR quality